Spectral response of sweet corn, squash, and beans to nitrogen, zinc and water treatments

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/298785
Title:
Spectral response of sweet corn, squash, and beans to nitrogen, zinc and water treatments
Author:
Amer, Saud Abdulaziz
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The study consisted of six experiments conducted to examine the spectral response of different varieties of corn (Zea mays), squash (Cucurbita pepo) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) under variable zinc (Zn), nitrogen (N) and water treatments. Five of these experiments were conducted in the greenhouse during 1988 and 1989. The sixth experiment was conducted in the field during the summer of 1989. Ground-based, remotely sensed data were collected over plant canopies during the growing period, using an Exotech Model 100 AX hand-held radiometer. The Exotech offers filter sets which match the thematic mapper (TM) bands 1 through 4 (0.45-0.52, 0.52-0.60, 0.63-0.69, and 0.76-0.90 μm). Canopy spectral reflectance and derived vegetation indices showed their ability to significantly discriminate among varieties and variable treatments. Soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI) mimics the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and transformation normalized difference vegetation index (TNDVI) and exhibited all the characteristics of the NDVI curve when there were no soil influences (a single soil type). Red and near infrared (NIR) reflectance factors exhibited ability in monitoring crop growth and development. The TNDVI showed its superiority in detecting variations and in correlating with ground truth data (biomass cover percent). However, the study showed that remotely sensed data were sensitive to variations (varieties and treatments), but the data did not differentiate between them, unless supported with ground truth data.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agriculture, Agronomy.; Agriculture, Plant Culture.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Soils and Water Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stroehlein, Jack L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSpectral response of sweet corn, squash, and beans to nitrogen, zinc and water treatmentsen_US
dc.creatorAmer, Saud Abdulazizen_US
dc.contributor.authorAmer, Saud Abdulazizen_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe study consisted of six experiments conducted to examine the spectral response of different varieties of corn (Zea mays), squash (Cucurbita pepo) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) under variable zinc (Zn), nitrogen (N) and water treatments. Five of these experiments were conducted in the greenhouse during 1988 and 1989. The sixth experiment was conducted in the field during the summer of 1989. Ground-based, remotely sensed data were collected over plant canopies during the growing period, using an Exotech Model 100 AX hand-held radiometer. The Exotech offers filter sets which match the thematic mapper (TM) bands 1 through 4 (0.45-0.52, 0.52-0.60, 0.63-0.69, and 0.76-0.90 μm). Canopy spectral reflectance and derived vegetation indices showed their ability to significantly discriminate among varieties and variable treatments. Soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI) mimics the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and transformation normalized difference vegetation index (TNDVI) and exhibited all the characteristics of the NDVI curve when there were no soil influences (a single soil type). Red and near infrared (NIR) reflectance factors exhibited ability in monitoring crop growth and development. The TNDVI showed its superiority in detecting variations and in correlating with ground truth data (biomass cover percent). However, the study showed that remotely sensed data were sensitive to variations (varieties and treatments), but the data did not differentiate between them, unless supported with ground truth data.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Agronomy.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Plant Culture.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoils and Water Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStroehlein, Jack L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStroehlein, J. L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTucker, T. C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBohn, Hinrichen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHutchinson, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberThames, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9123164en_US
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