Effective principal leadership practices as perceived by teachers in schools demonstrating continuous student academic improvement

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/298763
Title:
Effective principal leadership practices as perceived by teachers in schools demonstrating continuous student academic improvement
Author:
Truitt, Janice Lynn
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to investigate effective principal leadership behaviors as perceived by teachers in schools demonstrating continuous student academic improvement. The principal leadership behaviors, which were based on transformational leadership theory, were (1) provides vision, (2) models appropriate behavior, (3) fosters commitment to goals, (4) provides individualized support, (5) provides intellectual stimulation, and (6) holds high expectations. Continuous student academic improvement was defined as improved scores on the Stanford 9 Achievement Test for a cohort of students over a three-year period. The Principal Leadership Questionnaire (PLQ) (Valentine & Lucas, 2000) was administered to teachers in six schools which had demonstrated continuous student academic improvement. Focus groups were conducted with teachers in three of the six schools to define further the leadership behaviors they observed in their principals. The following conclusions were based on the findings of this study. (1) Teachers in schools demonstrating high continuous student academic improvement rated their principals significantly higher on all six transformational leadership behaviors than teachers in the medium and low continuous student academic improvement schools. (2) Principals who were strong in one of the principal leadership behaviors were strong in the other principal leadership behaviors. (3) All of the principal leadership behaviors were correlated with the school's academic gains. The correlations indicated that schools with high mean gains all had high mean teacher ratings. (4) Teachers in the high CSAI school identified more examples of how their principal modeled the six transformational leadership behaviors than did teachers in the medium CSAI and the low CSAI schools. These six transformational leadership behaviors, first identified by Podsakoff, MacKenzie, Moorman, and Fetter (1990) in their review of research, were expanded by Leithwood, Tomlinson, and Genge (1996) to provide indicators of each specific behavior. Principals who have a goal of increasing and maintaining high levels of student academic achievement should focus their day-to-day actions on modeling and emphasizing these transformational leadership behaviors. The findings of this study could be utilized to assist principals in ensuring that they demonstrate the transformational leadership behaviors identified by teachers in the schools demonstrating high continuous student academic improvement.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Administration.; Education, Educational Psychology.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hendricks, J. Robert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffective principal leadership practices as perceived by teachers in schools demonstrating continuous student academic improvementen_US
dc.creatorTruitt, Janice Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.authorTruitt, Janice Lynnen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate effective principal leadership behaviors as perceived by teachers in schools demonstrating continuous student academic improvement. The principal leadership behaviors, which were based on transformational leadership theory, were (1) provides vision, (2) models appropriate behavior, (3) fosters commitment to goals, (4) provides individualized support, (5) provides intellectual stimulation, and (6) holds high expectations. Continuous student academic improvement was defined as improved scores on the Stanford 9 Achievement Test for a cohort of students over a three-year period. The Principal Leadership Questionnaire (PLQ) (Valentine & Lucas, 2000) was administered to teachers in six schools which had demonstrated continuous student academic improvement. Focus groups were conducted with teachers in three of the six schools to define further the leadership behaviors they observed in their principals. The following conclusions were based on the findings of this study. (1) Teachers in schools demonstrating high continuous student academic improvement rated their principals significantly higher on all six transformational leadership behaviors than teachers in the medium and low continuous student academic improvement schools. (2) Principals who were strong in one of the principal leadership behaviors were strong in the other principal leadership behaviors. (3) All of the principal leadership behaviors were correlated with the school's academic gains. The correlations indicated that schools with high mean gains all had high mean teacher ratings. (4) Teachers in the high CSAI school identified more examples of how their principal modeled the six transformational leadership behaviors than did teachers in the medium CSAI and the low CSAI schools. These six transformational leadership behaviors, first identified by Podsakoff, MacKenzie, Moorman, and Fetter (1990) in their review of research, were expanded by Leithwood, Tomlinson, and Genge (1996) to provide indicators of each specific behavior. Principals who have a goal of increasing and maintaining high levels of student academic achievement should focus their day-to-day actions on modeling and emphasizing these transformational leadership behaviors. The findings of this study could be utilized to assist principals in ensuring that they demonstrate the transformational leadership behaviors identified by teachers in the schools demonstrating high continuous student academic improvement.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Administration.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHendricks, J. Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHendricks, J. Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcLean, Wadeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberQuinn, Daviden_US
dc.identifier.proquest3050327en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42727844en_US
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