Development of a Pulse Proteolysis Assay to Investigate Stability in the Measles Polymerase Nucleocapsid Binding Domain

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297801
Title:
Development of a Pulse Proteolysis Assay to Investigate Stability in the Measles Polymerase Nucleocapsid Binding Domain
Author:
Wan, Jonathan
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The nucleocapsid-binding domains (NBDs) form part of the paramyxovirus replication complex and mediate attachment to the nucleocapsid, a nucleoprotein complex containing the viral RNA genome. NBDs form a very simple helical bundle, and vary between intrinsically unstructured and highly stable in the case of mumps and measles respectively. Despite the differences in properties, these domains show similar sequence and structure. The differences between mumps and measles NBDs provide a point of comparison to investigate differences in structural stability. Using the measles protein as a starting point, we created variants of different stabilities and devised a convenient assay based on pulse proteolysis to rank the variants. A library of NBD variants fused to the SUMO protein were generated by random mutagenesis, and used as a test case for assay development. Three variants of different stabilities were sequenced and their apparent stability differences rationalized based on the mutations present. Pulse proteolysis was then used to screen for the stability and it was concluded to be an effective tool in screening the library for appropriate mutations to be analyzed.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Chemistry & Biochemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hausrath, Andrew

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of a Pulse Proteolysis Assay to Investigate Stability in the Measles Polymerase Nucleocapsid Binding Domainen_US
dc.creatorWan, Jonathanen_US
dc.contributor.authorWan, Jonathanen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe nucleocapsid-binding domains (NBDs) form part of the paramyxovirus replication complex and mediate attachment to the nucleocapsid, a nucleoprotein complex containing the viral RNA genome. NBDs form a very simple helical bundle, and vary between intrinsically unstructured and highly stable in the case of mumps and measles respectively. Despite the differences in properties, these domains show similar sequence and structure. The differences between mumps and measles NBDs provide a point of comparison to investigate differences in structural stability. Using the measles protein as a starting point, we created variants of different stabilities and devised a convenient assay based on pulse proteolysis to rank the variants. A library of NBD variants fused to the SUMO protein were generated by random mutagenesis, and used as a test case for assay development. Three variants of different stabilities were sequenced and their apparent stability differences rationalized based on the mutations present. Pulse proteolysis was then used to screen for the stability and it was concluded to be an effective tool in screening the library for appropriate mutations to be analyzed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistry & Biochemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHausrath, Andrew-
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.