Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297799
Title:
The Role of the Nurse in Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance
Author:
Zink, Erin Elizabeth
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One in 133 Americans has celiac disease and an unknown number have an intolerance to gluten, an abnormal response to the ingestion of gluten. With the average length of diagnosis ranging from 7 to 11 years, people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance often live in a state of malnutrition for years before diagnosis and treatment. Currently, the only treatment currently for celiac disease or gluten intolerance is lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet. The purpose of this paper is to review pertinent research related to the role of the nurse in the diagnosis and management of the spectrum of gluten sensitivity at both the registered nurse and advanced practice nurse level.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Michaels, Cathleen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Role of the Nurse in Celiac Disease and Gluten Intoleranceen_US
dc.creatorZink, Erin Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorZink, Erin Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne in 133 Americans has celiac disease and an unknown number have an intolerance to gluten, an abnormal response to the ingestion of gluten. With the average length of diagnosis ranging from 7 to 11 years, people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance often live in a state of malnutrition for years before diagnosis and treatment. Currently, the only treatment currently for celiac disease or gluten intolerance is lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet. The purpose of this paper is to review pertinent research related to the role of the nurse in the diagnosis and management of the spectrum of gluten sensitivity at both the registered nurse and advanced practice nurse level.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMichaels, Cathleen-
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