Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297776
Title:
Thermal Energy Extraction Methods for UAV Gliders
Author:
Umashankar, Rohit
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
An aircraft’s flight-time is restricted by its fuel capacity or battery life. This senior design project explores the benefits of extracting energy from the environment for a small, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), specifically focusing on static soaring and solar energy extraction. Soaring is accomplished by using thermals (sections of rising air created by solar radiation and terrain fluctuations) to obtain lift. This project focuses on simulation of a thermal to observe the effects of a thermal on an aircraft, development of control algorithms to utilize lift from the thermal, and integration of these algorithms with the ArduPilot Mega 2.5+ open source autopilot software and hardware. Software simulations in MATLAB and hardware-in-the-loop simulations in FlightGear were both used to develop the control algorithms that enhanced the original ArduPilot code to detect and capitalize upon rising air. These algorithms were then tested in real-time flights. Furthermore, direct solar energy was also extracted through the employment of solar panels in a custom-built glider. The combination of harvesting direct solar power to sustain the flight computer along with using efficient thermal detection algorithms to stay afloat enables the aircraft to soar for an extended duration while unhindered by a dependence on nonrenewable energy resources.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.E.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Aerospace Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Randall, Ryan

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThermal Energy Extraction Methods for UAV Glidersen_US
dc.creatorUmashankar, Rohiten_US
dc.contributor.authorUmashankar, Rohiten_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAn aircraft’s flight-time is restricted by its fuel capacity or battery life. This senior design project explores the benefits of extracting energy from the environment for a small, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), specifically focusing on static soaring and solar energy extraction. Soaring is accomplished by using thermals (sections of rising air created by solar radiation and terrain fluctuations) to obtain lift. This project focuses on simulation of a thermal to observe the effects of a thermal on an aircraft, development of control algorithms to utilize lift from the thermal, and integration of these algorithms with the ArduPilot Mega 2.5+ open source autopilot software and hardware. Software simulations in MATLAB and hardware-in-the-loop simulations in FlightGear were both used to develop the control algorithms that enhanced the original ArduPilot code to detect and capitalize upon rising air. These algorithms were then tested in real-time flights. Furthermore, direct solar energy was also extracted through the employment of solar panels in a custom-built glider. The combination of harvesting direct solar power to sustain the flight computer along with using efficient thermal detection algorithms to stay afloat enables the aircraft to soar for an extended duration while unhindered by a dependence on nonrenewable energy resources.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.E.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRandall, Ryan-
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