Characterizing the Potential for Neutrophils to Mediate the Inflammation Response Associated with Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297773
Title:
Characterizing the Potential for Neutrophils to Mediate the Inflammation Response Associated with Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitation
Author:
Torrecillas, Vanessa Faith
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Post-Resuscitation Injury (PRI) may contribute to poor recovery after cardiac arrest and resuscitation, and this complication may be due to a dramatic inflammatory response suspected to occur in the early hours following successful resuscitation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether blood neutrophils, a known source of oxidants under other acute inflammatory conditions, mediate an inflammatory response soon after resuscitation. Using a laboratory model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation (A/R), adult Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized and subjected to a cardiac arrest and resuscitation protocol. During the experiments, blood samples were taken at specific time points to monitor blood glucose and mean arterial blood pressure. Sham experiments were performed as a control. Tissues from animals receiving no surgical procedures were also obtained as a further control. After two hours of resuscitation, heart, lung, liver, and brain tissues were collected and quick-frozen. Later, samples were thawed, homogenized, and analyzed for neutrophilspecific myeloperoxidase (MPO) accumulation using the Hycult Biotech ELISA kit. MPO accumulation is used as an indicator of neutrophil sequestration in the organ. We found a marked increase in tissue MPO in the lung, indicative of neutrophil accumulation. There was a statistically significant difference (t-Test) between sham vs. resuscitation groups for both hepatic and cardiac tissues. These findings indicate that neutrophils do sequester in the heart and liver in the early hours following successful resuscitation. Because of their potential for oxidative injury, neutrophils likely contribute to the inflammatory response and cardiac stunning observed in the early hours of resuscitation. Efforts to limit neutrophil-mediated microvascular and oxidative injury may reduce PRI and improve recovery.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McDonagh, Paul

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCharacterizing the Potential for Neutrophils to Mediate the Inflammation Response Associated with Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitationen_US
dc.creatorTorrecillas, Vanessa Faithen_US
dc.contributor.authorTorrecillas, Vanessa Faithen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPost-Resuscitation Injury (PRI) may contribute to poor recovery after cardiac arrest and resuscitation, and this complication may be due to a dramatic inflammatory response suspected to occur in the early hours following successful resuscitation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether blood neutrophils, a known source of oxidants under other acute inflammatory conditions, mediate an inflammatory response soon after resuscitation. Using a laboratory model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation (A/R), adult Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized and subjected to a cardiac arrest and resuscitation protocol. During the experiments, blood samples were taken at specific time points to monitor blood glucose and mean arterial blood pressure. Sham experiments were performed as a control. Tissues from animals receiving no surgical procedures were also obtained as a further control. After two hours of resuscitation, heart, lung, liver, and brain tissues were collected and quick-frozen. Later, samples were thawed, homogenized, and analyzed for neutrophilspecific myeloperoxidase (MPO) accumulation using the Hycult Biotech ELISA kit. MPO accumulation is used as an indicator of neutrophil sequestration in the organ. We found a marked increase in tissue MPO in the lung, indicative of neutrophil accumulation. There was a statistically significant difference (t-Test) between sham vs. resuscitation groups for both hepatic and cardiac tissues. These findings indicate that neutrophils do sequester in the heart and liver in the early hours following successful resuscitation. Because of their potential for oxidative injury, neutrophils likely contribute to the inflammatory response and cardiac stunning observed in the early hours of resuscitation. Efforts to limit neutrophil-mediated microvascular and oxidative injury may reduce PRI and improve recovery.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcDonagh, Paul-
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