Staying Connected on the Home Front: Communication and Well-Being of Civilian Spouses During Deployment

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297772
Title:
Staying Connected on the Home Front: Communication and Well-Being of Civilian Spouses During Deployment
Author:
Tolhurst, Nicole Alexis
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this study, I examined the associations of communication frequency via asynchronous (i.e., email/internet, postal mail) and synchronous communication methods (i.e., commercial telephone, DSN telephone, military exchange provided phone, military video phone, and video teleconference) as associated with marital quality and psychological well-being in civilian wives during their service member husbands’ deployment (N = 2,230). I used a relational dialectics perspective to suggest that the relationship between communication frequency and well-being would be curvilinear such that increased communication frequency is beneficial up to a point where it then becomes detrimental for well-being. I found this curvilinear relationship for synchronous communication methods and marital quality, but synchronous communication was not significantly associated with psychological well-being. For asynchronous communication, although I expected curvilinear effects I found a positive linear relationship for both marital quality and psychological well-being. Overall, this study suggests that increased communication is not always better for well-being of civilian spouses during deployment periods.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Borden, Lynne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleStaying Connected on the Home Front: Communication and Well-Being of Civilian Spouses During Deploymenten_US
dc.creatorTolhurst, Nicole Alexisen_US
dc.contributor.authorTolhurst, Nicole Alexisen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this study, I examined the associations of communication frequency via asynchronous (i.e., email/internet, postal mail) and synchronous communication methods (i.e., commercial telephone, DSN telephone, military exchange provided phone, military video phone, and video teleconference) as associated with marital quality and psychological well-being in civilian wives during their service member husbands’ deployment (N = 2,230). I used a relational dialectics perspective to suggest that the relationship between communication frequency and well-being would be curvilinear such that increased communication frequency is beneficial up to a point where it then becomes detrimental for well-being. I found this curvilinear relationship for synchronous communication methods and marital quality, but synchronous communication was not significantly associated with psychological well-being. For asynchronous communication, although I expected curvilinear effects I found a positive linear relationship for both marital quality and psychological well-being. Overall, this study suggests that increased communication is not always better for well-being of civilian spouses during deployment periods.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBorden, Lynne-
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