Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297768
Title:
The Symbiosis of Culture, Nature, and Architecture
Author:
Survis, Emma Rose
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
My thesis is that culture and nature are the first to be ignored by the broad arm of globalization, and we cannot afford to recklessly abandon the cultures and ecosystems that define our world. Architecture cannot become yet another by-product of globalization but must reflect on, respond, and belong to the specific natural and cultural environment in which they exist. Given a site in Marfa, Texas and a program of an Institute of Contemporary Art, I studied extensively the culture and history of West Texas in order to understand what a building there should be. In my research, I discovered that living in West Texas boiled down to two very simple things: weather and survival. With this in mind, I studied the dog-trot house and the wrap-around porch house extensively and adapted my design off the precedent of these two styles. Thus, I designed a building that had an equality of indoor and outdoor and space, used the venturi effect to passively cool the spaces, and used natural stone walls and other vernacular materials that work effectively in the climate and create a building that will stand the test of time. This building exemplifies the identity of Marfa.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Architecture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Andrews, Brian

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Symbiosis of Culture, Nature, and Architectureen_US
dc.creatorSurvis, Emma Roseen_US
dc.contributor.authorSurvis, Emma Roseen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMy thesis is that culture and nature are the first to be ignored by the broad arm of globalization, and we cannot afford to recklessly abandon the cultures and ecosystems that define our world. Architecture cannot become yet another by-product of globalization but must reflect on, respond, and belong to the specific natural and cultural environment in which they exist. Given a site in Marfa, Texas and a program of an Institute of Contemporary Art, I studied extensively the culture and history of West Texas in order to understand what a building there should be. In my research, I discovered that living in West Texas boiled down to two very simple things: weather and survival. With this in mind, I studied the dog-trot house and the wrap-around porch house extensively and adapted my design off the precedent of these two styles. Thus, I designed a building that had an equality of indoor and outdoor and space, used the venturi effect to passively cool the spaces, and used natural stone walls and other vernacular materials that work effectively in the climate and create a building that will stand the test of time. This building exemplifies the identity of Marfa.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAndrews, Brian-
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