Decoding the Genetic Code: Unraveling the Language of Scientific Paradigms

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297762
Title:
Decoding the Genetic Code: Unraveling the Language of Scientific Paradigms
Author:
Shi, Aishan
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Scientific revolutions have not only significantly broadened our knowledge underlying physical laws and natural patterns, but also shifted the cultural paradigm through which science is understood and practiced. These paradigm shifts, as Thomas Kuhn denoted them, are facilitated through changes in language, because language is the only method of articulating - and thereby establishing - truth, according to Friedrich Nietzsche and Michel Foucalt. Steven Shapin analyzed the progression of these linguistic changes in global scientific revolutions and Bruno Latour categorized them in the local laboratory setting. One of the most recent revolutions in science, the discovery of the double helix by James Watson and Francis Crick, altered the understanding and application of genetics. James Watson’s personal account of this discovery, the Double Helix, makes the point to change the general perception of science as intellectual labor to innovative play. However, he does not portray his discovery in the scientific elegance that it deserves as the culmination of nearly a century of research and the marriage of quantum physics and biology. This thesis explores the paradigm shifts that developed with each scientific revolution, how they led to the double helix, and finally, the paradigm shift of the "Structure-Function Relationship" that accompanied this discovery.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dushane, Allison

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDecoding the Genetic Code: Unraveling the Language of Scientific Paradigmsen_US
dc.creatorShi, Aishanen_US
dc.contributor.authorShi, Aishanen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractScientific revolutions have not only significantly broadened our knowledge underlying physical laws and natural patterns, but also shifted the cultural paradigm through which science is understood and practiced. These paradigm shifts, as Thomas Kuhn denoted them, are facilitated through changes in language, because language is the only method of articulating - and thereby establishing - truth, according to Friedrich Nietzsche and Michel Foucalt. Steven Shapin analyzed the progression of these linguistic changes in global scientific revolutions and Bruno Latour categorized them in the local laboratory setting. One of the most recent revolutions in science, the discovery of the double helix by James Watson and Francis Crick, altered the understanding and application of genetics. James Watson’s personal account of this discovery, the Double Helix, makes the point to change the general perception of science as intellectual labor to innovative play. However, he does not portray his discovery in the scientific elegance that it deserves as the culmination of nearly a century of research and the marriage of quantum physics and biology. This thesis explores the paradigm shifts that developed with each scientific revolution, how they led to the double helix, and finally, the paradigm shift of the "Structure-Function Relationship" that accompanied this discovery.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDushane, Allison-
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.