Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297761
Title:
Long-Term Recovery Outcomes in Aphasia
Author:
Shatto, Rachel Renee; Goodman, Mara
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Aphasia is an acquired language impairment associated with damage to the language-dominant hemisphere. In this study, aphasia recovery outcomes were examined from 73 individuals who participated in aphasia treatment over extended periods of time. Aphasia quotient (AQ) scores attained from the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) were used as measurement of language change as well as classification of severity for all individuals. Across all participants, language performance improved an average of +5.62 AQ points over about four years. The slope of the recovery curve for the entire population was positive and significant. When participants were examined relative to aphasia severity, those in the moderate category showed the most improvement over time with an average increase of 11.68 AQ points. Age at the time of aphasia onset was a significant predictor of improvement in language performance as measured by the WAB, suggesting that younger individuals have a better prognosis for continued improvement over the years following the event. The findings from the study indicated that many individuals continue to improve even at relatively long times post onset, and that significant language gains can be made regardless of the amount of time passed, especially when the recovery process is not complicated by the effects of advanced age.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Beeson, Pélagie M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLong-Term Recovery Outcomes in Aphasiaen_US
dc.creatorShatto, Rachel Reneeen_US
dc.contributor.authorShatto, Rachel Reneeen_US
dc.contributor.authorGoodman, Maraen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAphasia is an acquired language impairment associated with damage to the language-dominant hemisphere. In this study, aphasia recovery outcomes were examined from 73 individuals who participated in aphasia treatment over extended periods of time. Aphasia quotient (AQ) scores attained from the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) were used as measurement of language change as well as classification of severity for all individuals. Across all participants, language performance improved an average of +5.62 AQ points over about four years. The slope of the recovery curve for the entire population was positive and significant. When participants were examined relative to aphasia severity, those in the moderate category showed the most improvement over time with an average increase of 11.68 AQ points. Age at the time of aphasia onset was a significant predictor of improvement in language performance as measured by the WAB, suggesting that younger individuals have a better prognosis for continued improvement over the years following the event. The findings from the study indicated that many individuals continue to improve even at relatively long times post onset, and that significant language gains can be made regardless of the amount of time passed, especially when the recovery process is not complicated by the effects of advanced age.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, and Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBeeson, Pélagie M.-
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