Cheating to Win: Cardiovascular & Physiological Effects of Performance-Enhancing Agents

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297758
Title:
Cheating to Win: Cardiovascular & Physiological Effects of Performance-Enhancing Agents
Author:
Sill, Andrew Phillip
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The current societal factors placed on athletes have been causing a dramatic rise in the use of performance-enhancing drugs and practices in recent years. The intensity of competition and the pressures from increases in talent and skill in athletic competitions have led many athletes to look for illegal and alternative ways of increasing their own performance. The use of these methods, such as blood transfusions, EPO injections, anabolic steroids, and stimulants, has been shown to be detrimental to cardiovascular health and the overall health of users. Side effects may cause permanent damage to vital organs and can lead to death over prolonged use. This literature review explains the mechanisms in which these practices promote performance enhancement in athletes. In addition, the effects of these methods on the cardiovascular system and other vital systems is explained. Finally, the ways in which athletic governing boards test athletes for illegal use of performance-enhancing drugs and practices is described. Many athletic organizations, such as the World Anti-Doping Agency and the International Olympic Committee, have placed bans on these methods of performance enhancement in order to promote fair and safe athletic competitions for all participants.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cohen, Zoe

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCheating to Win: Cardiovascular & Physiological Effects of Performance-Enhancing Agentsen_US
dc.creatorSill, Andrew Phillipen_US
dc.contributor.authorSill, Andrew Phillipen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe current societal factors placed on athletes have been causing a dramatic rise in the use of performance-enhancing drugs and practices in recent years. The intensity of competition and the pressures from increases in talent and skill in athletic competitions have led many athletes to look for illegal and alternative ways of increasing their own performance. The use of these methods, such as blood transfusions, EPO injections, anabolic steroids, and stimulants, has been shown to be detrimental to cardiovascular health and the overall health of users. Side effects may cause permanent damage to vital organs and can lead to death over prolonged use. This literature review explains the mechanisms in which these practices promote performance enhancement in athletes. In addition, the effects of these methods on the cardiovascular system and other vital systems is explained. Finally, the ways in which athletic governing boards test athletes for illegal use of performance-enhancing drugs and practices is described. Many athletic organizations, such as the World Anti-Doping Agency and the International Olympic Committee, have placed bans on these methods of performance enhancement in order to promote fair and safe athletic competitions for all participants.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCohen, Zoe-
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.