"What I Call a Wordy Man:" The Effects of Texts in Melville's The Confidence-Man

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297757
Title:
"What I Call a Wordy Man:" The Effects of Texts in Melville's The Confidence-Man
Author:
Shnier, Morgan Wyeth
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This paper examines the function of physical texts and the power of language itself in Herman Melville's 1857 novel The Confidence-Man. Throughout the novel, physical texts cause drastic changes in behavior and comportment in the characters who encounter them. Physical texts also function as a seemingly immutable signifier of authenticity and identity, but Melville later renders physical texts mutable and impossible to authenticate. The uncertain relationship between Melville's narrator and the novel itself calls into question the problem of documentation in the world outside of the novel.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dryden, Edgar A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.title"What I Call a Wordy Man:" The Effects of Texts in Melville's The Confidence-Manen_US
dc.creatorShnier, Morgan Wyethen_US
dc.contributor.authorShnier, Morgan Wyethen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the function of physical texts and the power of language itself in Herman Melville's 1857 novel The Confidence-Man. Throughout the novel, physical texts cause drastic changes in behavior and comportment in the characters who encounter them. Physical texts also function as a seemingly immutable signifier of authenticity and identity, but Melville later renders physical texts mutable and impossible to authenticate. The uncertain relationship between Melville's narrator and the novel itself calls into question the problem of documentation in the world outside of the novel.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDryden, Edgar A.-
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