Analyzing the Relationship Between Exclusive Breastfeeding and the Onset of Childhood Obesity at 9-12 Months of Age

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297750
Title:
Analyzing the Relationship Between Exclusive Breastfeeding and the Onset of Childhood Obesity at 9-12 Months of Age
Author:
Rosser, Casey Lynnell
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Childhood obesity is a public health crisis prevalent in the United States, particularly among Hispanics in Southern Arizona. There is much speculation that breastfeeding may be linked to a decreased risk of childhood obesity/overweight, but the association is unknown. Our purpose is to investigate the potential benefit of breastfeeding as a way to combat the obesity epidemic in Southern Arizona. The Ready.Set.StartSmart!(RSSS) database from a childhood obesity prevention study underway at The University of Arizona was used to examine whether there is a difference in the weight status of children who are exclusively breastfed compared to those who are bottle fed. We found children who were exclusively breastfed to be five times less likely to be overweight/obese at one year of age than those who were bottle fed(p=0.062). Despite the lack of statistical significance, our results indicate that breastfeeding may be a way to minimize the incidence of childhood obesity and overweight, though a larger sample size is needed. Other variables analyzed were: insurance status, primary language, birth order, mother’s age and pre-pregnancy BMI, RSSS intervention, and length of pregnancy. Of these, only the RSSS intervention status seemed to affect the overweight/obesity prevalence at one year of age.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Clemens, Conrad

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAnalyzing the Relationship Between Exclusive Breastfeeding and the Onset of Childhood Obesity at 9-12 Months of Ageen_US
dc.creatorRosser, Casey Lynnellen_US
dc.contributor.authorRosser, Casey Lynnellen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractChildhood obesity is a public health crisis prevalent in the United States, particularly among Hispanics in Southern Arizona. There is much speculation that breastfeeding may be linked to a decreased risk of childhood obesity/overweight, but the association is unknown. Our purpose is to investigate the potential benefit of breastfeeding as a way to combat the obesity epidemic in Southern Arizona. The Ready.Set.StartSmart!(RSSS) database from a childhood obesity prevention study underway at The University of Arizona was used to examine whether there is a difference in the weight status of children who are exclusively breastfed compared to those who are bottle fed. We found children who were exclusively breastfed to be five times less likely to be overweight/obese at one year of age than those who were bottle fed(p=0.062). Despite the lack of statistical significance, our results indicate that breastfeeding may be a way to minimize the incidence of childhood obesity and overweight, though a larger sample size is needed. Other variables analyzed were: insurance status, primary language, birth order, mother’s age and pre-pregnancy BMI, RSSS intervention, and length of pregnancy. Of these, only the RSSS intervention status seemed to affect the overweight/obesity prevalence at one year of age.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorClemens, Conrad-
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