Catching Flies with www.honey.com: The Revised Definition of Civil Disobedience Due to the Effect of Social Networks

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297740
Title:
Catching Flies with www.honey.com: The Revised Definition of Civil Disobedience Due to the Effect of Social Networks
Author:
Shaikh, Sonia
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Whether it is Gandhi’s 1940‘s campaign for independence from the British Empire, or the Civil Rights movement of the 1960’s in America, civil disobedience has long been the modus operandi for inspiring legal systems to enact change. It has been met with both applause and heckling for though it may be composed of moral intentions, it has also assumed a stance, which is contrary to the body of power at the time. The interpretation of civil disobedience itself has long been the center of controversy’s limelight. What differentiates an ordinary breach of law from an act of civil disobedience? What features compile civil disobedience? Is civil disobedience morally justified or is it nothing more than a euphemism for anarchy? The introduction and popularization of information technology and social media--including Twitter, Facebook, email, and so forth -- have come to affect not only the term’s common interpretation, but also the various issues that branch off from the core of civil disobedience. The purpose of this thesis includes compiling the various understandings of civil disobedience and establishing a conclusive definition that is both compelling and corresponding towards present day circumstances, whilst answering the questions that may often arise in its regard.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Philosophy
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gaus, Gerald

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCatching Flies with www.honey.com: The Revised Definition of Civil Disobedience Due to the Effect of Social Networksen_US
dc.creatorShaikh, Soniaen_US
dc.contributor.authorShaikh, Soniaen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhether it is Gandhi’s 1940‘s campaign for independence from the British Empire, or the Civil Rights movement of the 1960’s in America, civil disobedience has long been the modus operandi for inspiring legal systems to enact change. It has been met with both applause and heckling for though it may be composed of moral intentions, it has also assumed a stance, which is contrary to the body of power at the time. The interpretation of civil disobedience itself has long been the center of controversy’s limelight. What differentiates an ordinary breach of law from an act of civil disobedience? What features compile civil disobedience? Is civil disobedience morally justified or is it nothing more than a euphemism for anarchy? The introduction and popularization of information technology and social media--including Twitter, Facebook, email, and so forth -- have come to affect not only the term’s common interpretation, but also the various issues that branch off from the core of civil disobedience. The purpose of this thesis includes compiling the various understandings of civil disobedience and establishing a conclusive definition that is both compelling and corresponding towards present day circumstances, whilst answering the questions that may often arise in its regard.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGaus, Gerald-
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.