Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297731
Title:
Millenials and Attitudes Towards Work-Life Balance
Author:
Philippe, Sarah Nicole
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Students who are soon to be college graduates are approaching a transitional period in their life, filled with uncertainty and high demands. Graduating college is a huge transitional period, going from full-time student to the real workplace. Millennials that are soon to be graduates are custom to juggling many facets of their lives and making time for school, work, clubs, and friends. But do these soon-to be graduates understand the demands of the "real world" and are they taking in to consideration the conflicts that may arise concerning work-life balance? The purpose of this study is to investigate the attitudes of soon-to-be college graduates, part of the Millennial generation, and their attitudes towards work-life balance. The study captures the attitudes of soon-to-be graduates towards work-life balance in consideration with pursued industry, pursued career path and how much students value work-life balance before entering in to the workplace. This thesis provides understanding of these attitudes and the disconnect between pursued industry and valuation of work-life balance. It also describes suggestions for students and employees in order to foster practices of work-life balance in the workplace.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Business Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gilliland, Cindy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMillenials and Attitudes Towards Work-Life Balanceen_US
dc.creatorPhilippe, Sarah Nicoleen_US
dc.contributor.authorPhilippe, Sarah Nicoleen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractStudents who are soon to be college graduates are approaching a transitional period in their life, filled with uncertainty and high demands. Graduating college is a huge transitional period, going from full-time student to the real workplace. Millennials that are soon to be graduates are custom to juggling many facets of their lives and making time for school, work, clubs, and friends. But do these soon-to be graduates understand the demands of the "real world" and are they taking in to consideration the conflicts that may arise concerning work-life balance? The purpose of this study is to investigate the attitudes of soon-to-be college graduates, part of the Millennial generation, and their attitudes towards work-life balance. The study captures the attitudes of soon-to-be graduates towards work-life balance in consideration with pursued industry, pursued career path and how much students value work-life balance before entering in to the workplace. This thesis provides understanding of these attitudes and the disconnect between pursued industry and valuation of work-life balance. It also describes suggestions for students and employees in order to foster practices of work-life balance in the workplace.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Managementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGilliland, Cindy-
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