Politics of Memory and Moving Forward: The Rise of Memorials and Counter-Memorials in Post-Conflict Guatemala

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297730
Title:
Politics of Memory and Moving Forward: The Rise of Memorials and Counter-Memorials in Post-Conflict Guatemala
Author:
Pettersen, Christian Leland
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Guatemala officially ended its 36-year civil war with the signing of the peace accords in 1996. After the signing of the accords, two truth commissions recorded valuable oral testimony and published their findings, with the claim they were spreading restorative justice. At the same time, retribution seemed far off; many of the generals in charge of orchestrating the genocide had impunity. On March 19, 2013, criminal prosecution for those generals began. In my thesis, I argue that in addition to truth commissions and criminal prosecutions, there is a third component to public healing and justice: sites of memory. I recognize that sites of public memory have function, that they open spaces for dialogue and reconciliation. Through the analysis of three sites in Guatemala, I examine the relationship between sites of memory and neoliberal peace, arguing that they are an essential element to the formation of a common narrative, and the strengthening of regional hegemony.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Geography
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Oglesby, Elizabeth

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePolitics of Memory and Moving Forward: The Rise of Memorials and Counter-Memorials in Post-Conflict Guatemalaen_US
dc.creatorPettersen, Christian Lelanden_US
dc.contributor.authorPettersen, Christian Lelanden_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractGuatemala officially ended its 36-year civil war with the signing of the peace accords in 1996. After the signing of the accords, two truth commissions recorded valuable oral testimony and published their findings, with the claim they were spreading restorative justice. At the same time, retribution seemed far off; many of the generals in charge of orchestrating the genocide had impunity. On March 19, 2013, criminal prosecution for those generals began. In my thesis, I argue that in addition to truth commissions and criminal prosecutions, there is a third component to public healing and justice: sites of memory. I recognize that sites of public memory have function, that they open spaces for dialogue and reconciliation. Through the analysis of three sites in Guatemala, I examine the relationship between sites of memory and neoliberal peace, arguing that they are an essential element to the formation of a common narrative, and the strengthening of regional hegemony.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOglesby, Elizabeth-
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