Efficacy of Treating Waterborne Pathogens with the Antimicrobials Trichloromelamine, Ozone, and Acetic Acid

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297715
Title:
Efficacy of Treating Waterborne Pathogens with the Antimicrobials Trichloromelamine, Ozone, and Acetic Acid
Author:
Niedfeldt, Emily Ann
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The use of reclaimed water systems is increasing the need for easy-to-use and cost effective disinfectants available for consumer application. This study looked at efficacy of three disinfectants, trichloromelamine (TCM), ozone, and acetic acid, and their ability to reduce number of pathogens. Four samples of TCM were tested in a 10mL contaminated water to 1mL TCM solution ratio, plated for both total plate counts and to check for generic E.coli. It was observed that TCM 3 was able to give a 92.54 percent reduction of E.coli and was the only sample able to kill the E.coli that was present in the water. The other TCM solutions had percent reductions of, TCM1: 98.77, TCM2: 97.34, and TCM4: 87.64. Similar tests were conducted with ozone and mixtures. Ozonated brine water, and ozone mixed with acetic acid were both 100% effective at reducing bacterial load in the water samples (99.98 and 100%, respectively). The ozone was not as effective, with 85.7% reduction. These results indicate that TCM and ozone could be effective tools for consumer use to disinfect water holding tanks. More testing needs to be done in order to find out exactly how effective the disinfectants are in the long term.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Veterinary Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Marchello, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEfficacy of Treating Waterborne Pathogens with the Antimicrobials Trichloromelamine, Ozone, and Acetic Aciden_US
dc.creatorNiedfeldt, Emily Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorNiedfeldt, Emily Annen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of reclaimed water systems is increasing the need for easy-to-use and cost effective disinfectants available for consumer application. This study looked at efficacy of three disinfectants, trichloromelamine (TCM), ozone, and acetic acid, and their ability to reduce number of pathogens. Four samples of TCM were tested in a 10mL contaminated water to 1mL TCM solution ratio, plated for both total plate counts and to check for generic E.coli. It was observed that TCM 3 was able to give a 92.54 percent reduction of E.coli and was the only sample able to kill the E.coli that was present in the water. The other TCM solutions had percent reductions of, TCM1: 98.77, TCM2: 97.34, and TCM4: 87.64. Similar tests were conducted with ozone and mixtures. Ozonated brine water, and ozone mixed with acetic acid were both 100% effective at reducing bacterial load in the water samples (99.98 and 100%, respectively). The ozone was not as effective, with 85.7% reduction. These results indicate that TCM and ozone could be effective tools for consumer use to disinfect water holding tanks. More testing needs to be done in order to find out exactly how effective the disinfectants are in the long term.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineVeterinary Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMarchello, John-
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