Development of an Assay to Measure Lathanide Ion Concentrations in Biological Tissues

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297703
Title:
Development of an Assay to Measure Lathanide Ion Concentrations in Biological Tissues
Author:
Li, Jessica Faith
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) enables clinicians to visualize soft tissues at high image resolution with good coverage of the entire body and low risk of side effects compared to methods that utilize ionizing radiation. MRI’s downfalls are its poor sensitivity and contrast. The use of lanthanide-based contrast agents provides a way to improve the image sensitivity and contrast by improving the MRI signal in certain organs and the signal difference between signal-enhanced and unenhanced organs. However, lanthanide-based contrast agents can stay in the body for long periods of time and can cause complications, especially in patients with poor kidney function (sometimes leading to Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis). Currently, pre-clinical studies of new MRI contrast agents require tissue samples to be analyzed via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to determine the bio-distribution of the agent in the organs of the body. However, this method is both time-consuming and costly (~$50 per sample). We propose a method that utilizes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as an analytical tool to measure lanthanide concentration. When lanthanide ions are present, a magnetic susceptibility causes a shift in the NMR frequencies emitted by the sample. This shift, called the bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) shift, is proportionally related to the concentration of lanthanide ions in the tissue sample. In this study, the BMS shifts of the lanthanides gadolinium (Gd) at concentrations of 0.10-5.00 mM and dysprosium (Dy) at concentrations of 0.50-10.00 mM were measured to confirm the viability of this quick, accurate, and inexpensive assay of lanthanide concentrations within biological tissues.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Chemistry & Biochemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pagel, Mark "Marty"; Cordes, Matt

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of an Assay to Measure Lathanide Ion Concentrations in Biological Tissuesen_US
dc.creatorLi, Jessica Faithen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jessica Faithen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMagnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) enables clinicians to visualize soft tissues at high image resolution with good coverage of the entire body and low risk of side effects compared to methods that utilize ionizing radiation. MRI’s downfalls are its poor sensitivity and contrast. The use of lanthanide-based contrast agents provides a way to improve the image sensitivity and contrast by improving the MRI signal in certain organs and the signal difference between signal-enhanced and unenhanced organs. However, lanthanide-based contrast agents can stay in the body for long periods of time and can cause complications, especially in patients with poor kidney function (sometimes leading to Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis). Currently, pre-clinical studies of new MRI contrast agents require tissue samples to be analyzed via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to determine the bio-distribution of the agent in the organs of the body. However, this method is both time-consuming and costly (~$50 per sample). We propose a method that utilizes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as an analytical tool to measure lanthanide concentration. When lanthanide ions are present, a magnetic susceptibility causes a shift in the NMR frequencies emitted by the sample. This shift, called the bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) shift, is proportionally related to the concentration of lanthanide ions in the tissue sample. In this study, the BMS shifts of the lanthanides gadolinium (Gd) at concentrations of 0.10-5.00 mM and dysprosium (Dy) at concentrations of 0.50-10.00 mM were measured to confirm the viability of this quick, accurate, and inexpensive assay of lanthanide concentrations within biological tissues.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistry & Biochemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPagel, Mark "Marty"-
dc.contributor.advisorCordes, Matt-
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