Emotions and Decision Making: The Effects of Psychosocial Stress on Moral Judgement and Executive Functioning

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297700
Title:
Emotions and Decision Making: The Effects of Psychosocial Stress on Moral Judgement and Executive Functioning
Author:
Miller, Colleen Rose
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recent research suggesting the involvement of the activation of different cognitive and emotion driven areas of the brain when faced with a moral dilemma have led to the development of a Dual Systems Model in which these brain processes compete. The current study examined the effects of stress on these moral decisions. Thirty-nine participants were randomly assigned to either a control (N = 19) or experimental (N = 20) condition, the latter of which underwent a psychosocial stress induction using the Trier Social Stress Test procedure. Participant responses to a morality questionnaire were gathered both before and after this stress procedure, and compared by condition based on response type and response time. Changes in performance on a stroop task were also measured between conditions in order to provide insight on executive functioning abilities pre and post stressor. Results showed that stress may be related to increased response time on utilitarian decisions, and a decrease in the number of deontological responses, but overall these effects between groups were not significant. As a whole, the results do not indicate a significant effect of stress on changes in moral decision making or executive functioning.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Slaughter, Jerel

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEmotions and Decision Making: The Effects of Psychosocial Stress on Moral Judgement and Executive Functioningen_US
dc.creatorMiller, Colleen Roseen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Colleen Roseen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent research suggesting the involvement of the activation of different cognitive and emotion driven areas of the brain when faced with a moral dilemma have led to the development of a Dual Systems Model in which these brain processes compete. The current study examined the effects of stress on these moral decisions. Thirty-nine participants were randomly assigned to either a control (N = 19) or experimental (N = 20) condition, the latter of which underwent a psychosocial stress induction using the Trier Social Stress Test procedure. Participant responses to a morality questionnaire were gathered both before and after this stress procedure, and compared by condition based on response type and response time. Changes in performance on a stroop task were also measured between conditions in order to provide insight on executive functioning abilities pre and post stressor. Results showed that stress may be related to increased response time on utilitarian decisions, and a decrease in the number of deontological responses, but overall these effects between groups were not significant. As a whole, the results do not indicate a significant effect of stress on changes in moral decision making or executive functioning.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSlaughter, Jerel-
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