Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297692
Title:
Abba! The Daddy Relationship God Wants with You
Author:
Maakestad, Susan
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This project is part of a longer book manuscript presenting an in-depth exploration of God’s expressed desire for a Daddy relationship with man. His desire for intimacy in his role as man’s heavenly father is presented in layman’s terms, illuminated with biblical texts and the writings of classical and contemporary authors. These texts reflect God’s desire to call him Abba, and this is a highly specialized term: "Abba is not Hebrew, the language of liturgy, but Aramaic, the language of home and everyday life … Abba is the intimate word of a family circle." - Thomas A. Smail, The Forgotten Father. A contextual base in the introductory chapter explores God’s covenant relationship with mankind while analyzing institutional obstacles that may impede the intimate parent-child relationship. The more informal tone in the remaining chapters draws parallels between earthly parents’ interaction with, training of and devotion to their own children, as the foundational claim that man is created in the image of God is applied to this setting and the argument for a similar interaction, training and devotion in a relationship between God the Father and his children is advanced and supported.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; English and Creative Writing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Medine, Peter E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAbba! The Daddy Relationship God Wants with Youen_US
dc.creatorMaakestad, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorMaakestad, Susanen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis project is part of a longer book manuscript presenting an in-depth exploration of God’s expressed desire for a Daddy relationship with man. His desire for intimacy in his role as man’s heavenly father is presented in layman’s terms, illuminated with biblical texts and the writings of classical and contemporary authors. These texts reflect God’s desire to call him Abba, and this is a highly specialized term: "Abba is not Hebrew, the language of liturgy, but Aramaic, the language of home and everyday life … Abba is the intimate word of a family circle." - Thomas A. Smail, The Forgotten Father. A contextual base in the introductory chapter explores God’s covenant relationship with mankind while analyzing institutional obstacles that may impede the intimate parent-child relationship. The more informal tone in the remaining chapters draws parallels between earthly parents’ interaction with, training of and devotion to their own children, as the foundational claim that man is created in the image of God is applied to this setting and the argument for a similar interaction, training and devotion in a relationship between God the Father and his children is advanced and supported.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish and Creative Writingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMedine, Peter E.-
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