Screen for Photoreceptor and Other Eyespot Defective Mutants in Chlamydomonas

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297691
Title:
Screen for Photoreceptor and Other Eyespot Defective Mutants in Chlamydomonas
Author:
Luiten, Rebecca C.
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Chlamydomonas are single celled photosynthetic organisms that rely on their single eyespot to help them navigate towards light for use as an energy source. Their eyespot is crucial for their survival and as a result, the genetics behind the formation of the eyespot is regularly studied. To study and analyze several specific genes thought to be involved in eyespot function and formation, I collected phototaxis-defective mutants after mutagenic transformation of the arg7-2 auxotrophic strain with the ARG7 gene (arginine biosynthesis). Transformation of the Chlamydomonas genome was done by electroporation. The genes targeted in this study code for COP4 (photoreceptor), SOUL3 (affects eyespot size and placement), the MORN Repeat (attaches proteins to the membrane), MEC17 and MAP65 (affects tubulin dynamics), and the (PAP)-fibrillin domain (stabilizes pigment granule arrays) proteins. The ARG7 gene inserted into the Chlamydomonas genome randomly, and I intended to screen ultimately for strains with specific disruptions in these genes. The electroporation transformants were collected and analyzed using phototaxis techniques in order to find strains containing mutations that affect the functionality of the eyespot. Phototaxis-deficient mutants will be screened by PCR to identify those with disruptions in any of the targeted genes. Fluorescence and light microscopy techniques will be used to identify the mutant phenotypes and sequencing will determine the precise location of the gene insertion.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Biochemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dieckmann, Carol; Charest, Pascale

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleScreen for Photoreceptor and Other Eyespot Defective Mutants in Chlamydomonasen_US
dc.creatorLuiten, Rebecca C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLuiten, Rebecca C.en_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractChlamydomonas are single celled photosynthetic organisms that rely on their single eyespot to help them navigate towards light for use as an energy source. Their eyespot is crucial for their survival and as a result, the genetics behind the formation of the eyespot is regularly studied. To study and analyze several specific genes thought to be involved in eyespot function and formation, I collected phototaxis-defective mutants after mutagenic transformation of the arg7-2 auxotrophic strain with the ARG7 gene (arginine biosynthesis). Transformation of the Chlamydomonas genome was done by electroporation. The genes targeted in this study code for COP4 (photoreceptor), SOUL3 (affects eyespot size and placement), the MORN Repeat (attaches proteins to the membrane), MEC17 and MAP65 (affects tubulin dynamics), and the (PAP)-fibrillin domain (stabilizes pigment granule arrays) proteins. The ARG7 gene inserted into the Chlamydomonas genome randomly, and I intended to screen ultimately for strains with specific disruptions in these genes. The electroporation transformants were collected and analyzed using phototaxis techniques in order to find strains containing mutations that affect the functionality of the eyespot. Phototaxis-deficient mutants will be screened by PCR to identify those with disruptions in any of the targeted genes. Fluorescence and light microscopy techniques will be used to identify the mutant phenotypes and sequencing will determine the precise location of the gene insertion.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiochemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDieckmann, Carol-
dc.contributor.advisorCharest, Pascale-
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