The Effects of Various Pharmacological Agents on the Sleep and Locomotor Activity of Drosophila Models of ALS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297689
Title:
The Effects of Various Pharmacological Agents on the Sleep and Locomotor Activity of Drosophila Models of ALS
Author:
Lin, Ivy Carmen
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a lethal, adult-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disease in which the degeneration and death of motor neurons results in muscle weakness and paralysis throughout the body, followed by death due to respiratory failure. As a RNA-binding protein, TDP-43 has been implicated as both a cause and marker of both familial (fALS) and sporadic (sALS) cases of the disease. Our laboratory has generated a Drosophila model of ALS based on human TDP-43, which allows us to study various aspects of the disease pathology in vivo, including sleep and locomotor activity. Because pharmacological treatment of ALS is currently limited to alleviating symptoms, with severely limited effects on the increase in survival period, studies of potential therapeutics would significantly contribute to the treatment of the disease. In identifying potential candidates, 4-aminoquinoline (AAQ) has shown potential in increasing survival of Drosophila TDP-43 mutants. Using the Trikinetics Drosophila Activity Monitoring system, we examine the ability of AAQ to ameliorate defects in sleep and locomotor activity in our model. Our data indicate that AAQ can decrease sleep fragmentation, suggesting that this small molecule has the potential to be developed as a drug therapy for ALS.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Molecular and Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Zarnescu, Daniela

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Various Pharmacological Agents on the Sleep and Locomotor Activity of Drosophila Models of ALSen_US
dc.creatorLin, Ivy Carmenen_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, Ivy Carmenen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAmyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a lethal, adult-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disease in which the degeneration and death of motor neurons results in muscle weakness and paralysis throughout the body, followed by death due to respiratory failure. As a RNA-binding protein, TDP-43 has been implicated as both a cause and marker of both familial (fALS) and sporadic (sALS) cases of the disease. Our laboratory has generated a Drosophila model of ALS based on human TDP-43, which allows us to study various aspects of the disease pathology in vivo, including sleep and locomotor activity. Because pharmacological treatment of ALS is currently limited to alleviating symptoms, with severely limited effects on the increase in survival period, studies of potential therapeutics would significantly contribute to the treatment of the disease. In identifying potential candidates, 4-aminoquinoline (AAQ) has shown potential in increasing survival of Drosophila TDP-43 mutants. Using the Trikinetics Drosophila Activity Monitoring system, we examine the ability of AAQ to ameliorate defects in sleep and locomotor activity in our model. Our data indicate that AAQ can decrease sleep fragmentation, suggesting that this small molecule has the potential to be developed as a drug therapy for ALS.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZarnescu, Daniela-
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