The Effects of Starvation on Olfactory Responses of the Blood-Sucking Triatomin, Rhodnius prolixus

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297686
Title:
The Effects of Starvation on Olfactory Responses of the Blood-Sucking Triatomin, Rhodnius prolixus
Author:
Lee, Yan Mei
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The triatomine, Rhodnius prolixus, is a nocturnal, obligated blood-feeding insect that relies heavily on olfactory cues for finding mates, hosts, and refuges. Aggregation pheromones, present in conspecific feces and serve to mark refuge locations, elicit olfactory-driven behavior of the insect, which is modulated by temporal factors. However, it is not known if the physiological factor, hunger, also modulates the response to the pheromone. Behavioral experiments using nymphs of R. prolixus starved for three lengths of time post-ecdysis were conducted. Insects were individually tested during the three hours of scotophase in a dual choice, T-shaped olfactometer. Non-starved insects were found to distribute randomly in presence of two out of the four host-derived odors tested and aggregation pheromones. Starved nymphs significantly preferred the host-derived odors, but had reduced attraction to aggregation pheromones. Lastly, insects with prolonged starvation were significantly attracted to both aggregation pheromones and host-derived odors. Observed behaviors may present advantages for the insect in an ecological perspective.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hildebrand, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Starvation on Olfactory Responses of the Blood-Sucking Triatomin, Rhodnius prolixusen_US
dc.creatorLee, Yan Meien_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Yan Meien_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe triatomine, Rhodnius prolixus, is a nocturnal, obligated blood-feeding insect that relies heavily on olfactory cues for finding mates, hosts, and refuges. Aggregation pheromones, present in conspecific feces and serve to mark refuge locations, elicit olfactory-driven behavior of the insect, which is modulated by temporal factors. However, it is not known if the physiological factor, hunger, also modulates the response to the pheromone. Behavioral experiments using nymphs of R. prolixus starved for three lengths of time post-ecdysis were conducted. Insects were individually tested during the three hours of scotophase in a dual choice, T-shaped olfactometer. Non-starved insects were found to distribute randomly in presence of two out of the four host-derived odors tested and aggregation pheromones. Starved nymphs significantly preferred the host-derived odors, but had reduced attraction to aggregation pheromones. Lastly, insects with prolonged starvation were significantly attracted to both aggregation pheromones and host-derived odors. Observed behaviors may present advantages for the insect in an ecological perspective.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHildebrand, John-
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