Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297685
Title:
The Role of Sleep and Variability in Three Year Old Verb Learning
Author:
Leclerc, Julia Ann
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
At a young age children are able to acquire new verbs constantly. Two factors influencing this ability are of particular interest to this paper: variability and sleep. Previous studies have shown that toddlers can extend a verb to a novel actor when variability at training is minimal (Maguire et al. 2008) and that naps improve generalization (Gomez et al. 2006). Two groups of children (those who nap regularly and those who do not) were taught two new nonword verbs during training. One or four actors performed the new verbs. After training, participants either took a nap or stayed awake. Twenty-four hours later, during the test phase, participants saw two clips played side by side simultaneously. Each clip was of one of the verb learned. Participants were then asked to point to the girl who is, for example, "blicking". Children who napped after training did better on the Memory Test than those who did not. No group differences in regards to sleep after training were found for the Generalization Test. We can conclude from this that naps may boost memory of new verbs, if not the ability to generalize them.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gómez, Rebecca

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Sleep and Variability in Three Year Old Verb Learningen_US
dc.creatorLeclerc, Julia Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeclerc, Julia Annen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAt a young age children are able to acquire new verbs constantly. Two factors influencing this ability are of particular interest to this paper: variability and sleep. Previous studies have shown that toddlers can extend a verb to a novel actor when variability at training is minimal (Maguire et al. 2008) and that naps improve generalization (Gomez et al. 2006). Two groups of children (those who nap regularly and those who do not) were taught two new nonword verbs during training. One or four actors performed the new verbs. After training, participants either took a nap or stayed awake. Twenty-four hours later, during the test phase, participants saw two clips played side by side simultaneously. Each clip was of one of the verb learned. Participants were then asked to point to the girl who is, for example, "blicking". Children who napped after training did better on the Memory Test than those who did not. No group differences in regards to sleep after training were found for the Generalization Test. We can conclude from this that naps may boost memory of new verbs, if not the ability to generalize them.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, and Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGómez, Rebecca-
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