Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297655
Title:
Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia as a Function of Cognitive Attention
Author:
Ives, Rachel Ayn
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
RSA was assessed from electrocardiographic recordings from 95 individuals between the ages of 18 and 22 at resting, and while they were completing three tasks. The tasks were computerized performance tasks that provided increasing levels of difficulty and memory load. Subjects were asked to respond when the same letter repeated itself either one back, two back, or three back, depending on the task. The number of true positives declined as the tasks became increasingly difficult, and the number of false positives increased between the one back task and the two back task, but decreased between the two back task and the three back task. RSA suppression was greater for individuals with a higher resting RSA. RSA was enhanced during the one back task and suppressed during the two and three back tasks. No correlation was found between resting RSA and RSA suppression versus true or false positive responses during each task. No effect was found between resting RSA and RSA suppression versus positive or negative affect at onset of task. These results suggest that although there is a relationship between resting RSA suppression and cognitive attention during the tasks, it was not exactly as expected. The data also suggest that as the task becomes more difficult, RSA is suppressed to a higher extent.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Neuroscience and Cognitive Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Allen, John J. B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRespiratory Sinus Arrhythmia as a Function of Cognitive Attentionen_US
dc.creatorIves, Rachel Aynen_US
dc.contributor.authorIves, Rachel Aynen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRSA was assessed from electrocardiographic recordings from 95 individuals between the ages of 18 and 22 at resting, and while they were completing three tasks. The tasks were computerized performance tasks that provided increasing levels of difficulty and memory load. Subjects were asked to respond when the same letter repeated itself either one back, two back, or three back, depending on the task. The number of true positives declined as the tasks became increasingly difficult, and the number of false positives increased between the one back task and the two back task, but decreased between the two back task and the three back task. RSA suppression was greater for individuals with a higher resting RSA. RSA was enhanced during the one back task and suppressed during the two and three back tasks. No correlation was found between resting RSA and RSA suppression versus true or false positive responses during each task. No effect was found between resting RSA and RSA suppression versus positive or negative affect at onset of task. These results suggest that although there is a relationship between resting RSA suppression and cognitive attention during the tasks, it was not exactly as expected. The data also suggest that as the task becomes more difficult, RSA is suppressed to a higher extent.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscience and Cognitive Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAllen, John J. B.-
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