The Great European Witch Hunt in Elizabethan England and Jacobean Scotland

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297652
Title:
The Great European Witch Hunt in Elizabethan England and Jacobean Scotland
Author:
Hunt, Cole
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Great European Witch Hunt swept across Europe from the fifteenth through seventeenth centuries, but the nature of these witch hunts differed from country to country. These differences can be attributed to the fulfillment, or lack thereof, of the preconditions to the Great European Witch Hunt: the adoption of the inquisitorial judicial procedure, the use of torture, the movement of witchcraft trials to secular and local courts, a belief in maleficium facilitated by a pact with Satan, a belief that witches met in large groups to perform anti-human rituals at the sabbat and the belief in the witch’s ability to fly to such Satanic meetings. These preconditions were largely fulfilled on the Continent, while they were only partially fulfilled in England and in Scotland, and more-so in Scotland than in England. The result is that the Great European Witch Hunt took a much more extreme form on the European Continent than it did in England or Scotland, and it was more severe in Scotland than in England.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Karant-Nunn, Susan

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Great European Witch Hunt in Elizabethan England and Jacobean Scotlanden_US
dc.creatorHunt, Coleen_US
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Coleen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Great European Witch Hunt swept across Europe from the fifteenth through seventeenth centuries, but the nature of these witch hunts differed from country to country. These differences can be attributed to the fulfillment, or lack thereof, of the preconditions to the Great European Witch Hunt: the adoption of the inquisitorial judicial procedure, the use of torture, the movement of witchcraft trials to secular and local courts, a belief in maleficium facilitated by a pact with Satan, a belief that witches met in large groups to perform anti-human rituals at the sabbat and the belief in the witch’s ability to fly to such Satanic meetings. These preconditions were largely fulfilled on the Continent, while they were only partially fulfilled in England and in Scotland, and more-so in Scotland than in England. The result is that the Great European Witch Hunt took a much more extreme form on the European Continent than it did in England or Scotland, and it was more severe in Scotland than in England.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKarant-Nunn, Susan-
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