Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297646
Title:
The Effects of Background Noise on Multitasking
Author:
Hellman, Jaclyn Marie
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Multitasking in background noise may involve greater cognitive processing demands than multitasking in quiet due to an increase in listening effort (Rabbitt, 1968; Pichora-Fuller and Schneider, 2000). This study investigated the effect of background noise in the listening environment on the ability to perceive speech while performing a secondary task. A dual-task paradigm was chosen based on theories of attentional limitations (Broadbent, 1958; Kahneman, 1973; Pashler & Johnston, 1998). Forty-five native English speakers between 19-25 years of age with pure-tone thresholds within normal limits participated in the experiment. Word recognition and visual serial recall were selected as the dual-tasks because both require processing capacity in the phonological loop of working memory (Baddeley, 2003). The number of digits to be recalled was varied in order to increase cognitive demands and test the hypothesis that background noise would degrade multitasking abilities more in more difficult tasks. Results show a gradual decline in the ability to recall the digits with a decline in SNR value of the words in noise. This effect is increased when the number of digits to be recalled increases. Therefore, these results suggest that background noise can have negative effects on the ability to multitask, especially when task demands are increased.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Marrone, Nicole

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Background Noise on Multitaskingen_US
dc.creatorHellman, Jaclyn Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorHellman, Jaclyn Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMultitasking in background noise may involve greater cognitive processing demands than multitasking in quiet due to an increase in listening effort (Rabbitt, 1968; Pichora-Fuller and Schneider, 2000). This study investigated the effect of background noise in the listening environment on the ability to perceive speech while performing a secondary task. A dual-task paradigm was chosen based on theories of attentional limitations (Broadbent, 1958; Kahneman, 1973; Pashler & Johnston, 1998). Forty-five native English speakers between 19-25 years of age with pure-tone thresholds within normal limits participated in the experiment. Word recognition and visual serial recall were selected as the dual-tasks because both require processing capacity in the phonological loop of working memory (Baddeley, 2003). The number of digits to be recalled was varied in order to increase cognitive demands and test the hypothesis that background noise would degrade multitasking abilities more in more difficult tasks. Results show a gradual decline in the ability to recall the digits with a decline in SNR value of the words in noise. This effect is increased when the number of digits to be recalled increases. Therefore, these results suggest that background noise can have negative effects on the ability to multitask, especially when task demands are increased.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, and Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMarrone, Nicole-
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