Velopharyngeal Function During Speech Production in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297626
Title:
Velopharyngeal Function During Speech Production in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Author:
Kelhetter, Kaitlyn Marie
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that leads to decreased muscle function resulting in problems with movement, breathing, swallowing, and speech. In the United States, approximately 5,600 people are diagnosed with ALS annually (ALS Association [ALSA], 2010). ALS can attack muscles all over the body, including those in the velopharynx, a muscular valve-like structure located at the back of the oral cavity. In a healthy adult, the velopharynx closes off the passageway to the nasal cavity during speech production to direct air through the mouth rather than through the nose (except during productions of /m/, /n/, and /ng/). Speech that is produced with an open velopharynx sounds indistinct and has a nasal quality. Many people with ALS experience difficulty producing clear, articulate speech because their velopharynx remains open for the majority of speech sounds. As a result, their speech eventually becomes unintelligible. Currently, there is little information available about the function of the velopharynx in people with ALS. The purpose of this study is to describe velopharyngeal function during speech in people with ALS. This information will be compared with their speech rate and intelligibility scores, both common measures used to document speech decline.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hoit, Jeannette

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleVelopharyngeal Function During Speech Production in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosisen_US
dc.creatorKelhetter, Kaitlyn Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorKelhetter, Kaitlyn Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAmyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that leads to decreased muscle function resulting in problems with movement, breathing, swallowing, and speech. In the United States, approximately 5,600 people are diagnosed with ALS annually (ALS Association [ALSA], 2010). ALS can attack muscles all over the body, including those in the velopharynx, a muscular valve-like structure located at the back of the oral cavity. In a healthy adult, the velopharynx closes off the passageway to the nasal cavity during speech production to direct air through the mouth rather than through the nose (except during productions of /m/, /n/, and /ng/). Speech that is produced with an open velopharynx sounds indistinct and has a nasal quality. Many people with ALS experience difficulty producing clear, articulate speech because their velopharynx remains open for the majority of speech sounds. As a result, their speech eventually becomes unintelligible. Currently, there is little information available about the function of the velopharynx in people with ALS. The purpose of this study is to describe velopharyngeal function during speech in people with ALS. This information will be compared with their speech rate and intelligibility scores, both common measures used to document speech decline.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, and Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHoit, Jeannette-
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