The Universal Basic Income: A Proposal to Reshape the American Welfare State

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297625
Title:
The Universal Basic Income: A Proposal to Reshape the American Welfare State
Author:
Keene, Brenna Marie
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Universal Basic Income (UBI) is a proposal that can be dated back as far as the American Revolution, though the concept is foreign and new to most Americans. A UBI is a payment made to all members of a society without any conditions such as work requirements. Philosophers have designed many different forms of the UBI, but in this paper I will be examining three of the leading proposals. Philippe Van Parijs argues for the highest sustainable level for all permanent, adult members of society. Charles Murray proposes his "Plan" to replace all current transfer programs, such as Social Security and Medicare with an annual payment of $10,000. Finally, Bruce Ackerman and Anne Alstott propose the Stakeholder’s Society in which all citizens will receive $80,000 upon reaching the age of twenty-one. After examining what a UBI entails and then describing these three proposals, I argue that Murray’s Plan is more politically feasible in the American welfare state. The paper concludes with an analysis of the current costs of variations of the Plan to show that a UBI is a real solution to the problems facing the American welfare state.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Philosophy, Politics, Economics, & Law
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wall, Steven

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Universal Basic Income: A Proposal to Reshape the American Welfare Stateen_US
dc.creatorKeene, Brenna Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorKeene, Brenna Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Universal Basic Income (UBI) is a proposal that can be dated back as far as the American Revolution, though the concept is foreign and new to most Americans. A UBI is a payment made to all members of a society without any conditions such as work requirements. Philosophers have designed many different forms of the UBI, but in this paper I will be examining three of the leading proposals. Philippe Van Parijs argues for the highest sustainable level for all permanent, adult members of society. Charles Murray proposes his "Plan" to replace all current transfer programs, such as Social Security and Medicare with an annual payment of $10,000. Finally, Bruce Ackerman and Anne Alstott propose the Stakeholder’s Society in which all citizens will receive $80,000 upon reaching the age of twenty-one. After examining what a UBI entails and then describing these three proposals, I argue that Murray’s Plan is more politically feasible in the American welfare state. The paper concludes with an analysis of the current costs of variations of the Plan to show that a UBI is a real solution to the problems facing the American welfare state.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophy, Politics, Economics, & Lawen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWall, Steven-
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