Benefits of Community Research-Based Programming to Improve Freezing of Gait for Individuals with Parkinson Disease

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297620
Title:
Benefits of Community Research-Based Programming to Improve Freezing of Gait for Individuals with Parkinson Disease
Author:
Hamilton, Kristin Marie
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
For one week, six subjects with Parkinson Disease (PD) attended a boot camp at the Parkinson Wellness Recovery (PWR!) Gym. Each experienced a unique symptom of PD known as freezing of gait (FOG). Previous research supports task-specific exercise for improving PD symptoms; this study focuses on task-specific exercise to reduce FOG. Reducing the severity of hypokinetic and bradykinetic movement was addressed during the week through large amplitude training that was integrated into interval training during cardiovascular exercise, agility and postural control exercises, and real world environments. Five out of six subjects improved on a Freezing of Gait Assessment (FOGA) and four out of six subjects improved on the Pull Backwards Assessment. Task-specific improvement for all six individuals was achieved, with regards to typical freezing triggers-- narrow spaces, crowds, timed events, and more. These data suggest that techniques learned throughout the week can appear to be reflected into real-life. In addition, FOG specific training showed improvement in balance, a very important finidng in people that fall almost daily. Overall, specific exercise techniques assisted these six subjects in improving their quality of life, freezing severity, and postural control.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Farley, Becky

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleBenefits of Community Research-Based Programming to Improve Freezing of Gait for Individuals with Parkinson Diseaseen_US
dc.creatorHamilton, Kristin Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Kristin Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFor one week, six subjects with Parkinson Disease (PD) attended a boot camp at the Parkinson Wellness Recovery (PWR!) Gym. Each experienced a unique symptom of PD known as freezing of gait (FOG). Previous research supports task-specific exercise for improving PD symptoms; this study focuses on task-specific exercise to reduce FOG. Reducing the severity of hypokinetic and bradykinetic movement was addressed during the week through large amplitude training that was integrated into interval training during cardiovascular exercise, agility and postural control exercises, and real world environments. Five out of six subjects improved on a Freezing of Gait Assessment (FOGA) and four out of six subjects improved on the Pull Backwards Assessment. Task-specific improvement for all six individuals was achieved, with regards to typical freezing triggers-- narrow spaces, crowds, timed events, and more. These data suggest that techniques learned throughout the week can appear to be reflected into real-life. In addition, FOG specific training showed improvement in balance, a very important finidng in people that fall almost daily. Overall, specific exercise techniques assisted these six subjects in improving their quality of life, freezing severity, and postural control.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFarley, Becky-
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