An Ancient Detoxification Mechanism Co-Opted in the Recent Transition to Mustard-Feeding by Drosophilid Flies: A Role for Glutathione S-Transferase

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297599
Title:
An Ancient Detoxification Mechanism Co-Opted in the Recent Transition to Mustard-Feeding by Drosophilid Flies: A Role for Glutathione S-Transferase
Author:
Hailey, Alexander Lenard
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Herbivorous insects comprise more than 25% of all known living species; however, knowledge of the evolutionary adaptive processes that enable insects to overcome toxic plant defense compounds is unknown. In this study, we investigated the possible evolutionary co-option of the generalized mercapturic acid detoxification pathway in mustard feeding Scaptomyza that recently derived from microbe feeding drosophilids. The first step of this pathway utilizes the ancient dimeric detoxification enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) to catalyze conjugation of toxic electrophilic substrates, such as mustard derived isothiocyantes (ITCs), to glutathione (GSH). Of all GSTs, the insect specific GstD1 was selected as a candidate gene. Our findings showed S. nigrita GSTD1 (SnigGSTD1A) has a specificity constant (k(cat)/K(m)) two-fold to five-fold higher against the exceptionally toxic benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) when compared to non-mustard feeding drosophilids. X-ray crystallographic structure comparison suggests that mutations in and around the hydrophobic substrate binding pocket (H-site) may be responsible for this enhanced activity against ITCs.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Montfort, William R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn Ancient Detoxification Mechanism Co-Opted in the Recent Transition to Mustard-Feeding by Drosophilid Flies: A Role for Glutathione S-Transferaseen_US
dc.creatorHailey, Alexander Lenarden_US
dc.contributor.authorHailey, Alexander Lenarden_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHerbivorous insects comprise more than 25% of all known living species; however, knowledge of the evolutionary adaptive processes that enable insects to overcome toxic plant defense compounds is unknown. In this study, we investigated the possible evolutionary co-option of the generalized mercapturic acid detoxification pathway in mustard feeding Scaptomyza that recently derived from microbe feeding drosophilids. The first step of this pathway utilizes the ancient dimeric detoxification enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) to catalyze conjugation of toxic electrophilic substrates, such as mustard derived isothiocyantes (ITCs), to glutathione (GSH). Of all GSTs, the insect specific GstD1 was selected as a candidate gene. Our findings showed S. nigrita GSTD1 (SnigGSTD1A) has a specificity constant (k(cat)/K(m)) two-fold to five-fold higher against the exceptionally toxic benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) when compared to non-mustard feeding drosophilids. X-ray crystallographic structure comparison suggests that mutations in and around the hydrophobic substrate binding pocket (H-site) may be responsible for this enhanced activity against ITCs.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiochemistry and Molecular Biophysicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMontfort, William R.-
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