An Evidence-Based Protocol for Optical Care and Recovery of Opioid Exposed Neonates: A Best Practice Approach

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297590
Title:
An Evidence-Based Protocol for Optical Care and Recovery of Opioid Exposed Neonates: A Best Practice Approach
Author:
Good, Ariel Lea
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this thesis was to develop recommendations for best practice in nursing care of newborns exposed to opioids during intrauterine life. Approximately 3% of the 4.1 million women of childbearing age in the United States are believed to continue drug use throughout pregnancy (Gunn and Kriger, 2007). Opioid use during pregnancy is the leading cause of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS), defined as a constellation of signs and symptoms displayed upon neonatal withdrawal from gestational opioid exposure (Jannson and Velez, 2012). Nurses caring for newborns with NAS often work with outdated or inconsistent plans of care for promoting optimal healing for opioid exposed neonates. The best possible treatment for the neonate suffering from NAS requires that each nursery or Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) that cares for neonates with NAS develop a protocol that defines indications and procedural screening for mothers suspected of drug abuse during pregnancy. In addition to a screening and assessment protocol, nurseries and NICUs need to develop a sound protocol for effective nursing care for neonates suffering from various degrees of NAS.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.N.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Taylor, Darice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn Evidence-Based Protocol for Optical Care and Recovery of Opioid Exposed Neonates: A Best Practice Approachen_US
dc.creatorGood, Ariel Leaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGood, Ariel Leaen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this thesis was to develop recommendations for best practice in nursing care of newborns exposed to opioids during intrauterine life. Approximately 3% of the 4.1 million women of childbearing age in the United States are believed to continue drug use throughout pregnancy (Gunn and Kriger, 2007). Opioid use during pregnancy is the leading cause of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS), defined as a constellation of signs and symptoms displayed upon neonatal withdrawal from gestational opioid exposure (Jannson and Velez, 2012). Nurses caring for newborns with NAS often work with outdated or inconsistent plans of care for promoting optimal healing for opioid exposed neonates. The best possible treatment for the neonate suffering from NAS requires that each nursery or Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) that cares for neonates with NAS develop a protocol that defines indications and procedural screening for mothers suspected of drug abuse during pregnancy. In addition to a screening and assessment protocol, nurseries and NICUs need to develop a sound protocol for effective nursing care for neonates suffering from various degrees of NAS.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.N.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTaylor, Darice-
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