Stroop Task as a Measure of Executive Functioning in Older Adults: Preliminary Data from a Multi-Site Study of Moderate Sleep Restriction

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297566
Title:
Stroop Task as a Measure of Executive Functioning in Older Adults: Preliminary Data from a Multi-Site Study of Moderate Sleep Restriction
Author:
Garb, Leanna Rose
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Aim of Multi-Site Sleep Study is to examine the effects of chronic moderate sleep restriction on adults. Participants must be between 60- 80 years and sleep 8-9 hours (long sleepers) or 6-7.25 (average sleepers) hours per night. For my thesis, I will examine the first year data of the Stroop task (pre and posttest) looking at Stroop interference and Stroop time. My hypotheses are that long sleepers will benefit from moderate sleep restriction, but average sleepers will not. I predict no change will occur for the control group (both average and long sleepers). The study is fourteen weeks. Following baseline, participants will be assigned to the sleep restriction treatment or control treatment. The sleep restriction group will get an hour less of nightly sleep. Participants in the control group will get the same amount of sleep as baseline. Analysis revealed that there was a main effect of pre-post for interference of the Stroop task. There was no significant main effect of group or interaction between pre-post and group. For part 1, 2, and 3 Stroop time, there was a main effect of pre-post. There was no significant main effect of group or interaction between pre-post and group.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bootzin, Richard R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleStroop Task as a Measure of Executive Functioning in Older Adults: Preliminary Data from a Multi-Site Study of Moderate Sleep Restrictionen_US
dc.creatorGarb, Leanna Roseen_US
dc.contributor.authorGarb, Leanna Roseen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAim of Multi-Site Sleep Study is to examine the effects of chronic moderate sleep restriction on adults. Participants must be between 60- 80 years and sleep 8-9 hours (long sleepers) or 6-7.25 (average sleepers) hours per night. For my thesis, I will examine the first year data of the Stroop task (pre and posttest) looking at Stroop interference and Stroop time. My hypotheses are that long sleepers will benefit from moderate sleep restriction, but average sleepers will not. I predict no change will occur for the control group (both average and long sleepers). The study is fourteen weeks. Following baseline, participants will be assigned to the sleep restriction treatment or control treatment. The sleep restriction group will get an hour less of nightly sleep. Participants in the control group will get the same amount of sleep as baseline. Analysis revealed that there was a main effect of pre-post for interference of the Stroop task. There was no significant main effect of group or interaction between pre-post and group. For part 1, 2, and 3 Stroop time, there was a main effect of pre-post. There was no significant main effect of group or interaction between pre-post and group.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBootzin, Richard R.-
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