The Search for the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products in Avian Vasculature

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297557
Title:
The Search for the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products in Avian Vasculature
Author:
Eythrib, Farid Jalil
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are the products of a non-enzymatic reaction that occurs in the blood between glucose and albumin. The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is a transmembrane protein primarily located in the endothelial cells of small vasculature which binds AGEs. When RAGE binds to its ligands, it activates a chronic inflammatory response in the genes. While this is most likely a natural immune response, in diseases that result in chronically high levels of AGEs in the blood, such as diabetes, the chronic inflammation can cause damage to the vasculature. This occurs by altering the microenvironment of the basal membrane in tissues where RAGE is expressed. Complications such as edema, retinopathy, nephropathy and cardiovascular disorders can result from this inflammation. Birds have an average fasting blood glucose level 4-5 times higher than that of a human being, making them an ideal animal model for studying adaptation to chronic high blood glucose levels. Additionally, they , do not suffer from these RAGE-related inflammatory disorders. This suggests that RAGE may not be present in birds. Tissue from Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura) was examined for the presence of RAGE through antibody based protein identification techniques. Though not strongly conclusive, the evidence suggests that RAGE is not present in the small vasculature of Mourning Doves.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Braun, Eldon

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Search for the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products in Avian Vasculatureen_US
dc.creatorEythrib, Farid Jalilen_US
dc.contributor.authorEythrib, Farid Jalilen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAdvanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are the products of a non-enzymatic reaction that occurs in the blood between glucose and albumin. The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is a transmembrane protein primarily located in the endothelial cells of small vasculature which binds AGEs. When RAGE binds to its ligands, it activates a chronic inflammatory response in the genes. While this is most likely a natural immune response, in diseases that result in chronically high levels of AGEs in the blood, such as diabetes, the chronic inflammation can cause damage to the vasculature. This occurs by altering the microenvironment of the basal membrane in tissues where RAGE is expressed. Complications such as edema, retinopathy, nephropathy and cardiovascular disorders can result from this inflammation. Birds have an average fasting blood glucose level 4-5 times higher than that of a human being, making them an ideal animal model for studying adaptation to chronic high blood glucose levels. Additionally, they , do not suffer from these RAGE-related inflammatory disorders. This suggests that RAGE may not be present in birds. Tissue from Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura) was examined for the presence of RAGE through antibody based protein identification techniques. Though not strongly conclusive, the evidence suggests that RAGE is not present in the small vasculature of Mourning Doves.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBraun, Eldon-
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