Divorce, Policy, and Law: Returns to Mediation: Who Returns, Referral Sources, Reasons for Returning & Outcomes

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297556
Title:
Divorce, Policy, and Law: Returns to Mediation: Who Returns, Referral Sources, Reasons for Returning & Outcomes
Author:
Edais, Amanda Najeh
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The majority of courts have instituted a non-adversarial process, mediation, to enable divorcing couples to settle regarding parenting time and custody agreements. To date, there are plenty of studies analyzing the effectiveness of parenting time and custody mediation and the effect on the children involved. The studies, however, do not focus on couples who return to mediation a second, third, and fourth time even after the initial mediation has been settled. The study analyzed 965 couples mandated to attend custody and parenting time mediation in one jurisdiction within a four year follow up period after the initial mediation occurred. Of those couples, 160 (17%) returned to mediation. Of those 160, 24 (2.5%) couples returned a second time and later one couple (.1%) returned to mediation a third time. The outcomes of these returns should be considered when couples voluntarily return versus when they are court mandated to return and differences varying upon fathers and mothers reasons for returning. Data suggests the greater the amount of returns, the greater the inconsistency on why mothers and fathers decide to return to mediation. The study intends to fill in the gaps of mediation research in an attempt to better parenting time and custody mediation.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Beck, Connie J. A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDivorce, Policy, and Law: Returns to Mediation: Who Returns, Referral Sources, Reasons for Returning & Outcomesen_US
dc.creatorEdais, Amanda Najehen_US
dc.contributor.authorEdais, Amanda Najehen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe majority of courts have instituted a non-adversarial process, mediation, to enable divorcing couples to settle regarding parenting time and custody agreements. To date, there are plenty of studies analyzing the effectiveness of parenting time and custody mediation and the effect on the children involved. The studies, however, do not focus on couples who return to mediation a second, third, and fourth time even after the initial mediation has been settled. The study analyzed 965 couples mandated to attend custody and parenting time mediation in one jurisdiction within a four year follow up period after the initial mediation occurred. Of those couples, 160 (17%) returned to mediation. Of those 160, 24 (2.5%) couples returned a second time and later one couple (.1%) returned to mediation a third time. The outcomes of these returns should be considered when couples voluntarily return versus when they are court mandated to return and differences varying upon fathers and mothers reasons for returning. Data suggests the greater the amount of returns, the greater the inconsistency on why mothers and fathers decide to return to mediation. The study intends to fill in the gaps of mediation research in an attempt to better parenting time and custody mediation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBeck, Connie J. A.-
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