Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297552
Title:
The Best Interest of the Child in the State of Arizona
Author:
Donderewicz, Karen Lenora
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis explores current and historical child custody laws in the State of Arizona and how they have correlated with child development theories. It discusses the impact child development theories have had on Arizona child custody cases. Additionally, it includes an overview of early Arizona Supreme Court cases and the implications it has on the best interest of the child. The thesis also provides insight to problems with Arizona courts and the actors involved with making the decision for the best interest of the child. The investigation demonstrates a disconnection between judicial discretion and the best interest of the child standard. An example from the United States Supreme Court case Troxel v Granville (1999) is reviewed to illustrate how courts discretion, in general, can be misused. Overall, court discretion in Arizona is liberal and the impact it has on child custody decisions can sometimes conflict with the best interest of the child.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Westerland, Chad

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Best Interest of the Child in the State of Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorDonderewicz, Karen Lenoraen_US
dc.contributor.authorDonderewicz, Karen Lenoraen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores current and historical child custody laws in the State of Arizona and how they have correlated with child development theories. It discusses the impact child development theories have had on Arizona child custody cases. Additionally, it includes an overview of early Arizona Supreme Court cases and the implications it has on the best interest of the child. The thesis also provides insight to problems with Arizona courts and the actors involved with making the decision for the best interest of the child. The investigation demonstrates a disconnection between judicial discretion and the best interest of the child standard. An example from the United States Supreme Court case Troxel v Granville (1999) is reviewed to illustrate how courts discretion, in general, can be misused. Overall, court discretion in Arizona is liberal and the impact it has on child custody decisions can sometimes conflict with the best interest of the child.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWesterland, Chad-
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