Too Late for Campaign Finance Reform: A How-To Guide to Government Sanctioned Corruption

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297543
Title:
Too Late for Campaign Finance Reform: A How-To Guide to Government Sanctioned Corruption
Author:
Cohn, Sabrina
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In a world dominated by Quid-pro-quo dealing, it is natural to wonder what people are receiving when they contribute to campaigns. Certainly, they are trying to influence the outcome of elections. While this paper does propose solutions to curtail ‘buying influence,’ in light of the recent events, such as the Citizens United Supreme Court decision, it looks like reform/limitation is not the direction our nation is heading. The following pages will provide a discussion of the history of campaign finance, and an explanation of recent events that have impacted the country’s current trajectory with regard to campaign finance laws. In addition, it will answer questions relating to what campaign contributors can expect to receive in exchange for their ‘donations,’ and how you, too, (assuming you can afford it,) can buy your own friendly, neighborhood politician.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Westerland, Chad

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleToo Late for Campaign Finance Reform: A How-To Guide to Government Sanctioned Corruptionen_US
dc.creatorCohn, Sabrinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCohn, Sabrinaen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn a world dominated by Quid-pro-quo dealing, it is natural to wonder what people are receiving when they contribute to campaigns. Certainly, they are trying to influence the outcome of elections. While this paper does propose solutions to curtail ‘buying influence,’ in light of the recent events, such as the Citizens United Supreme Court decision, it looks like reform/limitation is not the direction our nation is heading. The following pages will provide a discussion of the history of campaign finance, and an explanation of recent events that have impacted the country’s current trajectory with regard to campaign finance laws. In addition, it will answer questions relating to what campaign contributors can expect to receive in exchange for their ‘donations,’ and how you, too, (assuming you can afford it,) can buy your own friendly, neighborhood politician.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWesterland, Chad-
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