Climate and Conflict in Central Asia: The Effect of Climate Change on the Politics of Central Asia

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297531
Title:
Climate and Conflict in Central Asia: The Effect of Climate Change on the Politics of Central Asia
Author:
Crandell, Casey Zepp
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Climate change is a growing concern, which will increasingly affect many aspects of society. These effects will be felt strongest in regions that are already unstable, or underdeveloped. The nations of Central Asia are both rife with underlying tensions, as well as underdeveloped economically and politically. The cases of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Uzbekistan are looked at in depth to deduce the effects of climate change on the natural resources of those countries, and therefore the probable results on the politics of those nations in the face of the climate change induced effects. The effect of climate change on the environment, and the ripple effect felt politically and economically, is also examined at the regional and international level. At the international level, special attention is paid to the influence of China, Russia, and the West. After examining the background, and the predicted consequences of climate change on that background, the likelihood of instability and conflict in the region is very high. Instances of particular concern are examined, as are factors that might mitigate some of the worst instability and conflict. Lessons learned from Central Asia’s experience with climate change are easily transferable to the many underdeveloped regions of the world that will soon feel the effects of climate change.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; International Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Decker, Wayne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleClimate and Conflict in Central Asia: The Effect of Climate Change on the Politics of Central Asiaen_US
dc.creatorCrandell, Casey Zeppen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrandell, Casey Zeppen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractClimate change is a growing concern, which will increasingly affect many aspects of society. These effects will be felt strongest in regions that are already unstable, or underdeveloped. The nations of Central Asia are both rife with underlying tensions, as well as underdeveloped economically and politically. The cases of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Uzbekistan are looked at in depth to deduce the effects of climate change on the natural resources of those countries, and therefore the probable results on the politics of those nations in the face of the climate change induced effects. The effect of climate change on the environment, and the ripple effect felt politically and economically, is also examined at the regional and international level. At the international level, special attention is paid to the influence of China, Russia, and the West. After examining the background, and the predicted consequences of climate change on that background, the likelihood of instability and conflict in the region is very high. Instances of particular concern are examined, as are factors that might mitigate some of the worst instability and conflict. Lessons learned from Central Asia’s experience with climate change are easily transferable to the many underdeveloped regions of the world that will soon feel the effects of climate change.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInternational Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDecker, Wayne-
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