Learning and Generalizing Non-Adjacency in 18 Month-Olds: The Role of Naps

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297528
Title:
Learning and Generalizing Non-Adjacency in 18 Month-Olds: The Role of Naps
Author:
Chavez, Savannah
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Research investigating the role of sleep in infant language learning has yielded several important results regarding rule learning. Fifteen month-old infants demonstrated how naps between exposure to a language and test encouraged the abstraction of a non-adjacent dependency rule governing the strings of the language (Gomez et al. 2006). Further, sleep within a short interval of exposure helped infants maintain this rule in memory 24 hours later (Hupbach, A., Gomez, R., Bootzin, R. & Nadel, L, 2009). However, it is unclear how these rules are applied to novel stimuli. In the present study, 18 month-old infants were presented with an artificial language guided by a rule of non-adjacency, where the first word of a string always predicts the final third word. Four hours later, after either napping or remaining awake, infants were tested on applying this rule to new vocabulary. We demonstrate that a nap during the interval between exposure and test not only facilitates rule abstraction, but also generalization to novel vocabulary following the same rule. Infants who did not nap between exposure and test did not show the same learning compared with napping infants. Naps seem to promote rule abstraction.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gómez, Rebecca

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLearning and Generalizing Non-Adjacency in 18 Month-Olds: The Role of Napsen_US
dc.creatorChavez, Savannahen_US
dc.contributor.authorChavez, Savannahen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResearch investigating the role of sleep in infant language learning has yielded several important results regarding rule learning. Fifteen month-old infants demonstrated how naps between exposure to a language and test encouraged the abstraction of a non-adjacent dependency rule governing the strings of the language (Gomez et al. 2006). Further, sleep within a short interval of exposure helped infants maintain this rule in memory 24 hours later (Hupbach, A., Gomez, R., Bootzin, R. & Nadel, L, 2009). However, it is unclear how these rules are applied to novel stimuli. In the present study, 18 month-old infants were presented with an artificial language guided by a rule of non-adjacency, where the first word of a string always predicts the final third word. Four hours later, after either napping or remaining awake, infants were tested on applying this rule to new vocabulary. We demonstrate that a nap during the interval between exposure and test not only facilitates rule abstraction, but also generalization to novel vocabulary following the same rule. Infants who did not nap between exposure and test did not show the same learning compared with napping infants. Naps seem to promote rule abstraction.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGómez, Rebecca-
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