Are Semantics Accessed for the Groundside of an Object? An Attempt to Replicate a Classic Experiment

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297526
Title:
Are Semantics Accessed for the Groundside of an Object? An Attempt to Replicate a Classic Experiment
Author:
Champeau, Rachel Therese
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The task of visual perception relies on one central ability: to determine figure from ground. Previous convention held that within an image only one feature could be deemed figure and the rest would be considered ground. Recent studies have shown that semantic access can be granted for objects on the groundside of an image. Specifically, Eagle et. al. (1966) found that semantic access was granted for a silhouette of a duck on the groundside of a tree image. The result of which caused more duck-related imagery within participants drawing than in participants who viewed just a tree image. The goal of the following study is to replicate the crucial findings of Eagle et. al. (1966). Three experiments were conducted attempting to replicate the original findings but were unable to do so. Failure to replicate may indicate that semantic access can only be granted for a limited amount of time.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Peterson, Mary A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAre Semantics Accessed for the Groundside of an Object? An Attempt to Replicate a Classic Experimenten_US
dc.creatorChampeau, Rachel Thereseen_US
dc.contributor.authorChampeau, Rachel Thereseen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe task of visual perception relies on one central ability: to determine figure from ground. Previous convention held that within an image only one feature could be deemed figure and the rest would be considered ground. Recent studies have shown that semantic access can be granted for objects on the groundside of an image. Specifically, Eagle et. al. (1966) found that semantic access was granted for a silhouette of a duck on the groundside of a tree image. The result of which caused more duck-related imagery within participants drawing than in participants who viewed just a tree image. The goal of the following study is to replicate the crucial findings of Eagle et. al. (1966). Three experiments were conducted attempting to replicate the original findings but were unable to do so. Failure to replicate may indicate that semantic access can only be granted for a limited amount of time.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPeterson, Mary A.-
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