Effects of Whole Body Vibration on Strength Gain in Untrained Subjects

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297524
Title:
Effects of Whole Body Vibration on Strength Gain in Untrained Subjects
Author:
Casey, Daniel James
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Whole-Body vibration (WBV) may lead to increased strength gains when coupled with weight and resistance training. It has been reported to increase muscle contraction and power by increasing muscle recruitment. This study set out to see if sessions of WBV following a workout would result in increased strength gains when compared to a control group. Twenty‐four subjects, 12 men and 12 women ages 18-26, with no prior history of musculoskeletal or heart disorders underwent a 3‐week workout routine designed to target and strengthen the knee flexors and extensors. Subjects were sorted into a control or vibe group with the vibe group receiving 5 minutes of post-workout WBV (30 Hz, Amplitude 13 mm). Strength testing was conducted using an isokinetic dynanometer to record knee flexor and extensor torque at the beginning and end of the intervention. A t‐ test was performed for statistical analysis using SPSS to compare the means of the control and vibe group’s strength changes. P values ranges from 0.08 to 0.98, showing no significant differences between the vibe and control group (P > 0.05). It is concluded that in the short term, WBV following resistance training does not improve strength gains in healthy untrained subjects.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Going, Scott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffects of Whole Body Vibration on Strength Gain in Untrained Subjectsen_US
dc.creatorCasey, Daniel Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorCasey, Daniel Jamesen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhole-Body vibration (WBV) may lead to increased strength gains when coupled with weight and resistance training. It has been reported to increase muscle contraction and power by increasing muscle recruitment. This study set out to see if sessions of WBV following a workout would result in increased strength gains when compared to a control group. Twenty‐four subjects, 12 men and 12 women ages 18-26, with no prior history of musculoskeletal or heart disorders underwent a 3‐week workout routine designed to target and strengthen the knee flexors and extensors. Subjects were sorted into a control or vibe group with the vibe group receiving 5 minutes of post-workout WBV (30 Hz, Amplitude 13 mm). Strength testing was conducted using an isokinetic dynanometer to record knee flexor and extensor torque at the beginning and end of the intervention. A t‐ test was performed for statistical analysis using SPSS to compare the means of the control and vibe group’s strength changes. P values ranges from 0.08 to 0.98, showing no significant differences between the vibe and control group (P > 0.05). It is concluded that in the short term, WBV following resistance training does not improve strength gains in healthy untrained subjects.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGoing, Scott-
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