Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297522
Title:
Examining the Concept of Reality in Mystical Islam Through Poetry
Author:
Carranza, Racquel Parente
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Throughout human history the individual has been faced with the definite nature of its physical existence. The soul, however is able to transcend our mundane realm and venture into higher or lower realms of being. The dichotomy of existence - this life and the next - is found across all religions and belief systems in some form. The problem of defining a particular reality is extensive and varies from individual to individual. Naturally the effort to attain closeness with the infinite requires cognitive and emotional strength. The mystical union is one wherein the definite merges with the everlasting and a difference between the two seemingly opposite concepts ceases to exist. The Islamic mystical tradition, Sufism, provides both philosophical and emotive means of addressing the concept of reality in its many forms. The poetic gaze of Sufism allows expressions of ecstasy, logic and love while encouraging its audience to polish the mirror of its soul. Through the works of al-Ghazali, Ibn Arabi, and Rumi, reality is presented as a rich, complex idea that cannot be defined concretely. Nevertheless it can be said that closeness with God allows the human soul to transcend lower, even insignificant, realms of reality.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Religious Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nava, Alexander

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleExamining the Concept of Reality in Mystical Islam Through Poetryen_US
dc.creatorCarranza, Racquel Parenteen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarranza, Racquel Parenteen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThroughout human history the individual has been faced with the definite nature of its physical existence. The soul, however is able to transcend our mundane realm and venture into higher or lower realms of being. The dichotomy of existence - this life and the next - is found across all religions and belief systems in some form. The problem of defining a particular reality is extensive and varies from individual to individual. Naturally the effort to attain closeness with the infinite requires cognitive and emotional strength. The mystical union is one wherein the definite merges with the everlasting and a difference between the two seemingly opposite concepts ceases to exist. The Islamic mystical tradition, Sufism, provides both philosophical and emotive means of addressing the concept of reality in its many forms. The poetic gaze of Sufism allows expressions of ecstasy, logic and love while encouraging its audience to polish the mirror of its soul. Through the works of al-Ghazali, Ibn Arabi, and Rumi, reality is presented as a rich, complex idea that cannot be defined concretely. Nevertheless it can be said that closeness with God allows the human soul to transcend lower, even insignificant, realms of reality.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineReligious Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNava, Alexander-
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