Examinations and Privatization: Competition in the Japanese Education System

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297516
Title:
Examinations and Privatization: Competition in the Japanese Education System
Author:
Burns, Kyle Joseph
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The simple Japanese saying, "the nail that sticks out gets hammered down," speaks an uncountable number of words about Japanese society and education. After the war, remodeling the education system was an important goal of both the Japanese government and the Occupation government alike. The result was an education system that highly resembled the Japanese military pre-war: highly focused on organization, egalitarianism, and "morality" rather than cognitive skills. For the last half century these characteristics have been hotly debated as either key features to the success of Japan's economy or reasons for Japan's economic troubles in the last two decades. Either way, the debates on what direction the education system should go now reveal much about the perceptions of social mobility in Japan. That is, should Japan continue to be a fairly egalitarian system based on "groupism?" Or should it follow the United States and give up egalitarianism for fostering individuality and competition? In this thesis I explain some of the common ways that social mobility has been discussed and analyzed in Japan. Then I analyze arguably Japan's most prestigious university, Tokyo University, and see what it says about the Japanese education system and social mobility in Japan as a whole.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; East Asian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McVeigh, Brian

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleExaminations and Privatization: Competition in the Japanese Education Systemen_US
dc.creatorBurns, Kyle Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurns, Kyle Josephen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe simple Japanese saying, "the nail that sticks out gets hammered down," speaks an uncountable number of words about Japanese society and education. After the war, remodeling the education system was an important goal of both the Japanese government and the Occupation government alike. The result was an education system that highly resembled the Japanese military pre-war: highly focused on organization, egalitarianism, and "morality" rather than cognitive skills. For the last half century these characteristics have been hotly debated as either key features to the success of Japan's economy or reasons for Japan's economic troubles in the last two decades. Either way, the debates on what direction the education system should go now reveal much about the perceptions of social mobility in Japan. That is, should Japan continue to be a fairly egalitarian system based on "groupism?" Or should it follow the United States and give up egalitarianism for fostering individuality and competition? In this thesis I explain some of the common ways that social mobility has been discussed and analyzed in Japan. Then I analyze arguably Japan's most prestigious university, Tokyo University, and see what it says about the Japanese education system and social mobility in Japan as a whole.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEast Asian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcVeigh, Brian-
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