Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297512
Title:
Face-ism and the Effects of Facial Prominence Manipulation
Author:
Berger, Kelly Marie
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Previous research has found that the media tends to portray men in terms of their faces and women in terms of their bodies. The measure of this face to body ratio is called facial prominence, or face-ism. High face-ism has been associated with higher perceptions of positive attributes. In this study, online survey participants were asked to help design a prestigious company’s print advertisement. Participants were shown three different stimulus persons, each in a high face-ism condition and a low face-ism condition, and were asked to choose which image of the person best portrayed dominance, intelligence, attractiveness, and ambition. Surprisingly, participants more frequently chose the low face-ism images of the stimuli to represent these traits. Participants showed preference for male stimuli with high facial prominence and preference for female stimuli with low facial prominence. No significant relationship was found between participants’ amount of daily media consumption and facial prominence preference. No significant relationship was found between facial prominence of the stimuli and participants’ ability to remember detail about the stimuli. Further research is warranted because facial prominence manipulation has many potential effects and the existing research on the topic is inconsistent.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Donnerstein, Edward

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFace-ism and the Effects of Facial Prominence Manipulationen_US
dc.creatorBerger, Kelly Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorBerger, Kelly Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has found that the media tends to portray men in terms of their faces and women in terms of their bodies. The measure of this face to body ratio is called facial prominence, or face-ism. High face-ism has been associated with higher perceptions of positive attributes. In this study, online survey participants were asked to help design a prestigious company’s print advertisement. Participants were shown three different stimulus persons, each in a high face-ism condition and a low face-ism condition, and were asked to choose which image of the person best portrayed dominance, intelligence, attractiveness, and ambition. Surprisingly, participants more frequently chose the low face-ism images of the stimuli to represent these traits. Participants showed preference for male stimuli with high facial prominence and preference for female stimuli with low facial prominence. No significant relationship was found between participants’ amount of daily media consumption and facial prominence preference. No significant relationship was found between facial prominence of the stimuli and participants’ ability to remember detail about the stimuli. Further research is warranted because facial prominence manipulation has many potential effects and the existing research on the topic is inconsistent.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDonnerstein, Edward-
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