The Effect of Implicit Stereotypes on Medical Professionals' Health Behavior Change Recommendations for Hispanic Patients

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297497
Title:
The Effect of Implicit Stereotypes on Medical Professionals' Health Behavior Change Recommendations for Hispanic Patients
Author:
Brucks, Melanie
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study investigated the role of implicit stereotyping of Hispanic patients on medical decision-making among students in the medical profession. Students first completed a lexical decision task to measure their implicit stereotyping of noncompliance and health risk for Hispanic patients. Then, participants responded a to medical case vignette involving either a Hispanic or White patient. Participants were instructed to make immediate treatment decisions, preventive lifestyle recommendations, and to rate the importance of certain factors in their decisions. Implicit bias was demonstrated for the health risk stereotype but not the non-compliance stereotype. Recommendations were compared based on patient race and level of implicit stereotype activation. Results demonstrated a main effect for patient race. Participants were more likely to recommend lifestyle changes to the White patient compared to the Hispanic patient. In addition, participants, on average, recommended more rigorous lifestyle changes for the Hispanic patient compared to the White patient. Implicit stereotyping only moderated the relationship of race and treatment recommendations for recommendations for smoking cessation treatment plans, alcohol reduction, and cardiovascular exercise. In addition, it was found that participants with high noncompliance implicit stereotyping rated factors relating to non-compliance as more important to their decision when treating the Hispanic patient.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stone, Jeff

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Effect of Implicit Stereotypes on Medical Professionals' Health Behavior Change Recommendations for Hispanic Patientsen_US
dc.creatorBrucks, Melanieen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrucks, Melanieen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present study investigated the role of implicit stereotyping of Hispanic patients on medical decision-making among students in the medical profession. Students first completed a lexical decision task to measure their implicit stereotyping of noncompliance and health risk for Hispanic patients. Then, participants responded a to medical case vignette involving either a Hispanic or White patient. Participants were instructed to make immediate treatment decisions, preventive lifestyle recommendations, and to rate the importance of certain factors in their decisions. Implicit bias was demonstrated for the health risk stereotype but not the non-compliance stereotype. Recommendations were compared based on patient race and level of implicit stereotype activation. Results demonstrated a main effect for patient race. Participants were more likely to recommend lifestyle changes to the White patient compared to the Hispanic patient. In addition, participants, on average, recommended more rigorous lifestyle changes for the Hispanic patient compared to the White patient. Implicit stereotyping only moderated the relationship of race and treatment recommendations for recommendations for smoking cessation treatment plans, alcohol reduction, and cardiovascular exercise. In addition, it was found that participants with high noncompliance implicit stereotyping rated factors relating to non-compliance as more important to their decision when treating the Hispanic patient.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStone, Jeff-
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