The Influence of Site Familiarity and Kin Interactions on the Dispersal of a Passerine Bird

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297489
Title:
The Influence of Site Familiarity and Kin Interactions on the Dispersal of a Passerine Bird
Author:
Aguillon, Stepfanie Maria
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Dispersal is a fundamental component of life history, but determining the causal factors behind individual dispersal decisions is often difficult. However, it is known that competitive and cooperative interactions can play an important role. Western bluebirds (Sialia mexicana) provide a unique opportunity to investigate the role of kin interactions mediated by aggressive behavior on local dispersal. A long-term dataset on relatedness, natal and breeding location, cavity density, and aggressive behavior was used to test the hypotheses. First-time breeding males dispersed non-randomly and settled closer than expected to their natal nest and father. Because fathers were frequently breeding at the natal nest, distance to both was strongly correlated. However, in cases where fathers did not return to breed, sons settled significantly closer to their natal nest suggesting that fathers may deter sons from settling as close to their natal territory as they would prefer. Although no significant role of aggression has yet to be found, there does appear to be some cooperation between kin over available cavity resources. These results support the importance of natal site familiarity and kin interactions in the local dispersal decisions of western bluebirds, but further studies are necessary to disentangle the relative importance of each.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Duckworth, Renée

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Influence of Site Familiarity and Kin Interactions on the Dispersal of a Passerine Birden_US
dc.creatorAguillon, Stepfanie Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAguillon, Stepfanie Mariaen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDispersal is a fundamental component of life history, but determining the causal factors behind individual dispersal decisions is often difficult. However, it is known that competitive and cooperative interactions can play an important role. Western bluebirds (Sialia mexicana) provide a unique opportunity to investigate the role of kin interactions mediated by aggressive behavior on local dispersal. A long-term dataset on relatedness, natal and breeding location, cavity density, and aggressive behavior was used to test the hypotheses. First-time breeding males dispersed non-randomly and settled closer than expected to their natal nest and father. Because fathers were frequently breeding at the natal nest, distance to both was strongly correlated. However, in cases where fathers did not return to breed, sons settled significantly closer to their natal nest suggesting that fathers may deter sons from settling as close to their natal territory as they would prefer. Although no significant role of aggression has yet to be found, there does appear to be some cooperation between kin over available cavity resources. These results support the importance of natal site familiarity and kin interactions in the local dispersal decisions of western bluebirds, but further studies are necessary to disentangle the relative importance of each.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDuckworth, Renée-
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