Anticipatory Coarticulation in Typically Developing Children and in Children with Speech Disorders

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297455
Title:
Anticipatory Coarticulation in Typically Developing Children and in Children with Speech Disorders
Author:
Swanson, Leah Terese
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Purpose: To assess the differences in anticipatory coarticulation in adults, typically developing children, and children with speech sound disorders, to address whether children develop smaller speech motor plans from larger speech motor plants, and to determine whether children with speech sound disorders exhibit abnormal coarticulation. Method: Speech samples from 10 adult women, 8 typically-developing children (aged 5 to 11 years), and 6 speech sound disordered children. Nine CVC nonwords were elicited using combinations of /s/, /j/, /i/, and /u/. Results: Adults exhibited whole utterance modifications. Younger children appeared to exhibit less coarticulation than adults. Children with speech sound disorders had idiosyncratic findings. Conclusions: These preliminary data support the hypothesis that children start with smaller units. This implies that children over time develop greater coarticulation. The data also showed that children with speech sound disorders have idiosyncratic coarticulation. Clearer patters and stronger conclusions may emerge with a larger sample size.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Maas, Edwin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAnticipatory Coarticulation in Typically Developing Children and in Children with Speech Disordersen_US
dc.creatorSwanson, Leah Tereseen_US
dc.contributor.authorSwanson, Leah Tereseen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To assess the differences in anticipatory coarticulation in adults, typically developing children, and children with speech sound disorders, to address whether children develop smaller speech motor plans from larger speech motor plants, and to determine whether children with speech sound disorders exhibit abnormal coarticulation. Method: Speech samples from 10 adult women, 8 typically-developing children (aged 5 to 11 years), and 6 speech sound disordered children. Nine CVC nonwords were elicited using combinations of /s/, /j/, /i/, and /u/. Results: Adults exhibited whole utterance modifications. Younger children appeared to exhibit less coarticulation than adults. Children with speech sound disorders had idiosyncratic findings. Conclusions: These preliminary data support the hypothesis that children start with smaller units. This implies that children over time develop greater coarticulation. The data also showed that children with speech sound disorders have idiosyncratic coarticulation. Clearer patters and stronger conclusions may emerge with a larger sample size.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, and Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMaas, Edwin-
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.