Can Purchases Make Us Happier? Perhaps, if We Tell Others about Them

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297047
Title:
Can Purchases Make Us Happier? Perhaps, if We Tell Others about Them
Author:
Bastos, Wilson
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 07-Feb-2014
Abstract:
The question of what type of purchase (i.e., experiential vs. material) typically advances more happiness has been answered (Van Boven and Gilovich, 2003). This dissertation employed three different manipulation methods across six studies to investigate what underlies this effect. A consistent pattern of results demonstrated that verbal sharing (i.e., telling others) helps explain the superiority of experiential purchases in advancing happiness. Moreover, I found that people's greater inclination to share about their experiential (vs. material) purchases is driven by their expectation of being more highly regarded by their listeners. Taken together, these findings shed light on a behavioral (i.e., sharing) and psychological process (i.e., expected regard) that help us understand why experiences make people happier than do material objects.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Happiness; Material and Experiential Purchases; Regard; Verbal Sharing; Word of Mouth; Management; Consumer Behavior
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brucks, Merrie

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCan Purchases Make Us Happier? Perhaps, if We Tell Others about Themen_US
dc.creatorBastos, Wilsonen_US
dc.contributor.authorBastos, Wilsonen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 07-Feb-2014en_US
dc.description.abstractThe question of what type of purchase (i.e., experiential vs. material) typically advances more happiness has been answered (Van Boven and Gilovich, 2003). This dissertation employed three different manipulation methods across six studies to investigate what underlies this effect. A consistent pattern of results demonstrated that verbal sharing (i.e., telling others) helps explain the superiority of experiential purchases in advancing happiness. Moreover, I found that people's greater inclination to share about their experiential (vs. material) purchases is driven by their expectation of being more highly regarded by their listeners. Taken together, these findings shed light on a behavioral (i.e., sharing) and psychological process (i.e., expected regard) that help us understand why experiences make people happier than do material objects.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectHappinessen_US
dc.subjectMaterial and Experiential Purchasesen_US
dc.subjectRegarden_US
dc.subjectVerbal Sharingen_US
dc.subjectWord of Mouthen_US
dc.subjectManagementen_US
dc.subjectConsumer Behavioren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrucks, Merrieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLevy, Sidney J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJanakiraman, Narayanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStone, Jeffen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMehl, Matthiasen_US
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