What Structures Network Structure? How Class, Culture, and Context Matter in Creating Social Capital

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/297028
Title:
What Structures Network Structure? How Class, Culture, and Context Matter in Creating Social Capital
Author:
Schultz, Jennifer Lee
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A considerable body of research shows that network structure can either assist or hinder one's access to social capital. Though the effects of particular structural arrangements of relationships are well known, there is comparatively little research on how a person might come to have one structural arrangement of ties over another. This study asks: What structures network structure? What cultural templates guide persons in their practice of friendship and in managing, maintaining, and adapting their personal communities over time? What contextual factors influence the duration and intensity of social relationships? Respondents were asked to make a list of "people who are important to you" and to describe the relationships individually while labeling each person on a social map. Interviews were coded using content analysis software in order to assess emergent cultural themes and the settings from which social relationships were drawn. Interview data confirmed respondents' use of cultural templates in the practice of friendship, which may affect one's ability to acquire and/or lose social capital. Interview data demonstrated how material resources may impact the vigor with which persons engage with social settings. Finally, some respondents reported important voluntary relationships that are at once high-commitment and low-contact. Frequently this type of tie arose when a relationship had outlived its original social context. This finding challenges the idea that contact and commitment usually go together in voluntary relationships.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Context; Culture; Foci; Friendship; Social Networks; Sociology; Class
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brieger, Ronald L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWhat Structures Network Structure? How Class, Culture, and Context Matter in Creating Social Capitalen_US
dc.creatorSchultz, Jennifer Leeen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchultz, Jennifer Leeen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA considerable body of research shows that network structure can either assist or hinder one's access to social capital. Though the effects of particular structural arrangements of relationships are well known, there is comparatively little research on how a person might come to have one structural arrangement of ties over another. This study asks: What structures network structure? What cultural templates guide persons in their practice of friendship and in managing, maintaining, and adapting their personal communities over time? What contextual factors influence the duration and intensity of social relationships? Respondents were asked to make a list of "people who are important to you" and to describe the relationships individually while labeling each person on a social map. Interviews were coded using content analysis software in order to assess emergent cultural themes and the settings from which social relationships were drawn. Interview data confirmed respondents' use of cultural templates in the practice of friendship, which may affect one's ability to acquire and/or lose social capital. Interview data demonstrated how material resources may impact the vigor with which persons engage with social settings. Finally, some respondents reported important voluntary relationships that are at once high-commitment and low-contact. Frequently this type of tie arose when a relationship had outlived its original social context. This finding challenges the idea that contact and commitment usually go together in voluntary relationships.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectContexten_US
dc.subjectCultureen_US
dc.subjectFocien_US
dc.subjectFriendshipen_US
dc.subjectSocial Networksen_US
dc.subjectSociologyen_US
dc.subjectClassen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrieger, Ronald L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGalaskiewicz, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrant, Donen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrieger, Ronald L.en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.