Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/296459
Title:
Wastewater - A Resource
Author:
Fain, Norm
Affiliation:
Wilson & Company Engineers, Phoenix, Arizona 85044
Issue Date:
20-Apr-1991
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
As the Southwest United States grows and develops, one basic resource becomes a primary necessity for survival: Water. Currently, accepted sources are being consumed at a higher rate than nature replenishes them. This is necessitating the need to find and develop new water resources. In conjunction with the proper treatment and management, wastewater is a water resource, known as reuse. Properly managed, reused water can augment the available water supply. Primary applications include irrigation of agricultural and landscaped areas, surface water recreational areas, and groundwater recharge. These uses relieve the demands on the generally accepted water resources, thus increasing the net water supply. The required level of treatment varies with the intended reuse application. Treatment levels for reuse range from secondary to tertiary treatment systems. Some reuse applications provide additional treatment to the water. The reuser must assure that the treatment system and reuse application provide an equal or improved water quality to that of the receiving body of water. Regardless of the application, stringent operation and maintenance of the reuse system is essential. A well planned management program will minimize hazards associated with reuse of wastewater. This program is required to keep the liabilities of both the treatment plant and reuse site owners to a minimum. Without this, reuse is not a viable option. The underlying questions remain to determine the feasibility of reuse for a community: Does the water supply require augmentation to meet the demands of the future? Is the Owner willing to address and implement a diligent system management program?
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleWastewater - A Resourceen_US
dc.contributor.authorFain, Normen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWilson & Company Engineers, Phoenix, Arizona 85044en_US
dc.date.issued1991-04-20-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractAs the Southwest United States grows and develops, one basic resource becomes a primary necessity for survival: Water. Currently, accepted sources are being consumed at a higher rate than nature replenishes them. This is necessitating the need to find and develop new water resources. In conjunction with the proper treatment and management, wastewater is a water resource, known as reuse. Properly managed, reused water can augment the available water supply. Primary applications include irrigation of agricultural and landscaped areas, surface water recreational areas, and groundwater recharge. These uses relieve the demands on the generally accepted water resources, thus increasing the net water supply. The required level of treatment varies with the intended reuse application. Treatment levels for reuse range from secondary to tertiary treatment systems. Some reuse applications provide additional treatment to the water. The reuser must assure that the treatment system and reuse application provide an equal or improved water quality to that of the receiving body of water. Regardless of the application, stringent operation and maintenance of the reuse system is essential. A well planned management program will minimize hazards associated with reuse of wastewater. This program is required to keep the liabilities of both the treatment plant and reuse site owners to a minimum. Without this, reuse is not a viable option. The underlying questions remain to determine the feasibility of reuse for a community: Does the water supply require augmentation to meet the demands of the future? Is the Owner willing to address and implement a diligent system management program?en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/296459-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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